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LinkedIn LinkedIn Profile

Compilation LinkedIn Q&A #5

I got 6 questions this past week about using LinkedIn as a Business Tool and decided to put the questions and answers into both an article and in a YouTube video series.

I hope these questions and the answers are useful for you:

Question #1 – When should I update LinkedIn after I quit my job?

There is no one clear answer to this question.

I recommend you mark the job as ended when you are ready to do so.

If you are retiring, make this step a Celebration, maybe with friends and/or co-workers.

If you are moving to another job, make this change as soon as you can. If you are in business development or community engagement role you should make this change within a few days.

If you are unemployed and actively looking for a job, you may wait until you find that next great job. so make the change.

If you are leaving the job because the organization is toxic or a horrible place to work you want to not only mark the job as ended, you may also want to remove the job from your LinkedIn Profile. This depends on how long you worked there.

How quickly you mark the job as ended depends on your own situation.

However, plan to do this step as soon as you are ready. Don’t forget to do it.

Question #2 – What should I post to get noticed on LinkedIn?

The answer to this question depends on what you want to be noticed for?

Additionally, posting content is not the only way to get noticed.

Engaging on existing conversations (content) is a powerful way to be noticed.

If you want to be noticed as an authority in your industry, you should be posting content and engaging on content that is relevant to the industry and meaningful to those you want to notice you.

If you want to be noticed as a community advocate, you should be posting and engaging on content that is relevant to your community.

Being clear on who you want to be noticed by is vital for you to determine what content to use.

What you post must be highly relevant and of interest to your target audience. You should minimize posting content that is all about you and/or your business.

This is similar to going to networking events in person. If every time you show up you are handing out your brochures and business cards in time the people in the networking events will begin to turn their backs on you.

Show up regularly with good, useful, interesting stories about others, the industry, community, etc, and they will accept a story now and then about your business.

Don’t post the same types of content every time you show up on LinkedIn. Mix it up. Different people want to ‘consume’ different types of content. Videos, articles, links to good & relevant content you find online, short posts, images, and documents are all good types of content to use.

If you can’t create your own content, consider having someone help you to create content that creates interest in your target audience.

Question #3 – Should a Company be on LinkedIn with their Company Name?

Not every company needs to have a Company Page on LinkedIn.

However, no Company should use a personal LinkedIn Profile to show up on LinkedIn. Personal Profiles are for human beings.

If a company wants to be represented on LinkedIn beyond their employee’s LinkedIn Profiles, they should create a LinkedIn Company Page and plan on feeding it.

A well-built LinkedIn Company Page focused on the company’s target audience can become an additional branding and even lead generation tool.

However, this takes work.

You must do the following:

Create the page content highly focused on your target audience, not all about the business. This is not an About web page that we see on company websites. The target audience wants to know how the company can serve them.

Regularly provide content that is relevant and useful to your target audience. Again, they don’t want to see posts that say your company has the best widgets ever. They want to discover how your widgets are helpful to them.

Additionally, the content you share on your LinkedIn Company Page can be about the industry, your community, your target audience, and other interesting stories.

Every now and then the content can be about your growing and developing team, your business, and your products. 

Remember to write the content in context to your target audience.

Question #4 – How long should a LinkedIn Post be for maximum views?

A LinkedIn post can have as many as 3000 characters.

A LinkedIn post can also have up to 9 images on it.

You can have a document, a video, and/or a link to online content in a LinkedIn post as well.

Lots of authors know how to write content that appeals to their target audience and keeps them interested in reading.

Unfortunately, this is not a skill most LinkedIn Members have.

Christopher Chang wrote an article in December 2021 on this topic. where he mentioned relevant, actionable, interesting, fun, intriguing, inspiration as content types that get the best views. He did not indicate post length as an important attribute of these types of posts.

Here is Christopher’s article – https://www.linkedin.com/business/marketing/blog/social-media-marketing/our-highest-performing-social-posts-why-did-they-resonate

Dominick Sorrentino wrote an article in January 2022 on the 5 different LinkedIn Post types (text, native video, blogs, third party, photos/graphics). Regarding text only he also did not mention the length of the post, however, he did speak to including relevant hashtags, keeping the sentences short and meaningful, and using a conversational tone that shows your audience you are accessible and sincere.

Here is Dominick’s article – https://www.brafton.com/blog/social-media/5-of-the-best-types-of-content-to-post-on-linkedin/

I’ve seen a few interesting and worthy of reading long LinkedIn posts. However, these are few and far between and often not the most important style of sharing on LinkedIn.

Question #5 – Can two people use the same LinkedIn Account?

LinkedIn Profiles are intended to represent a single human being. Therefore the answer is no.

Furthermore, the LinkedIn Terms & Services Dos & Don’ts section states you will not share a LinkedIn Profile with another person.

Here is the LinkedIn Terms of Services user Agreement – https://www.linkedin.com/legal/user-agreement#dos

LinkedIn is a human to human social networking site. It is the world’s largest professional networking platform.

LinkedIn Members expect to be networking with a single human being when they are engaging with a LinkedIn Profile. The messaging, invites, posts, comments, replies, are all assumed to be from and by a single human being.

I have experienced LinkedIn Members who have others manage their LinkedIn activity. The invites and messaging are from virtual assistants or people on their staff. Once we connect the tone of the conversation changes when the actual human associated with the account shows up. For many, including myself, this is not what we expect or want when engaging with anyone on LinkedIn.

Note, if LinkedIn discovers you are sharing your LinkedIn Profile with another it is not unlikely that your account will be shut down. This is another reason I do not recommend using LinkedIn in this manner.

Question #6 – How do I read unsent Messages on LinkedIn?

This is another version of a similar question I get often. Thus, I decided to answer this one.

There are possibly two scenarios to this question.

#1 – How do I read my draft LinkedIn messages?

There is no draft folder for LinkedIn messages. If you start a message and then begin to navigate away from the unsent message, LinkedIn will ask you if you want to cancel navigating away or discard the message. If the page refreshes you lose the message that you started.

#2 – How do I read unsent messages that I have not received yet?

Like every other messaging platform, you will never see the draft message another person, in this case, a LinkedIn Member is writing until they hit the send button.

In LinkedIn Messaging there are options to view UnRead, Archived and even Spam messaged. However, there is no draft or view an unsent message intended for you.

Here is the full YouTube video answer to all of these questions. You’ll find the Table of Contents in the Description Box

/Teddy

Categories
LinkedIn LinkedIn Profile

Tell the relevant stories thru your LinkedIn Profile

A LinkedIn Profile has numerous predefined areas for us to populate with information that tells our target audience who we are, what we have done, and what we do today.

However, not everything we have done or do easily fits into these predefined sections of LinkedIn Profile.

Here are a few examples to consider:

  • Tutoring – often we think of this as a form of education. But sometimes this could be  work. If you tutored someone else for more than a week or two, maybe you want add it as an experience entry. Include the improvement the person you tutored achieved from their work with you. This could be seen as a training skill to some business owners and hiring managers.
  • Family Home Care – I hear of this as a distraction to many from the typical career achievements. However, this could be an experience entry where you show your project management skills, budgeting, time management, mentoring, organization skills, etc. Look deeply into the work did and think beyond family home care.
  • At Home Schooling –  Many of those who have provided this service their students did not look at it much beyond the title.  Again, consider PM skills, organization, training, mentoring, scheduling, etc. etc.
  • Running a ‘Side Hustle’ or at home business – I know lots of people who have Ebay, Etsy, Facebook Market Place, Craigs List, small sign businesses, niche photography businesses, even people who purchase abandoned storage units and resell the contents. The skills used to do these jobs can be very useful to hiring managers, if you can present the skills you used and developed while doing this work.

When looking at your experiences consider, what skills did you use in these experiences?

Often you have to dig deep and look at the experiences differently than you are inclined to do.

All of the experiences we have play a role in our professional development in ways we never imagined. Tell these stories on your LinkedIn Profile, where relevant and useful to build your brand.

  • Look at your volunteer activities in different ways.
  • Look at the courses you have taken over the years, in different ways.
  • Do the same for your overall education experiences, publications you have written, certifications you have achieved, the people you have worked with, and on, and on.

Being able to tell the relevant stories as best as you can often positions you as a better resource or candidate than the others.

/Teddy

Categories
LinkedIn

Better ways to use Cold Messaging on LinkedIn

The debate about cold calling wages on.

Many feel it’s a powerful way to build a book of business.

Many feel it’s a total waste of time.

I feel cold calling is like the old-fashioned chalkboard. We can still use it, but why would you since now we have whiteboards and even better, we have smartboards.

I refuse to use a chalkboard, except if I want to show my Grandkids what they are. I like whiteboards and even have one in my office. I use it now and then when I am thinking ‘out loud’. I love smartboards and use them when I have the need. I even use a smartboard app now and then when I am in a strategic conversation with a client or even with myself. Again, I don’t have a chalkboard.

Back to cold-calling. I refuse to cold call. Now, I have done my fair share of cold calling. Way back in the day. I had long lists of names, companies, and phone numbers. Eventually, we added email addresses to these lists. I was fairly successful in cold calling and cold emailing.

Today, I have better systems, technologies, and processes that help me to be more effective in reaching out to people who did not know me.

BTW, in my opinion, and for the sake of this article, cold calling as it’s called, does not include the use of these systems, tools, or processes. The moment you touch someone and they know you touched them, it’s no longer cold-calling.

Back to my processes

I have found that using numerous digital & human touches provides the best results for contacting, connecting with, and most importantly, getting into a conversation with a prospect.

Here is the YouTube video where I discuss my touchpoints prior to cold messaging on LinkedIn.

Read the touchpoints I use to make messaging to people who did not know me on LinkedIn:

  1. I review the LinkedIn Profile of the LinkedIn Member to find relevance and any substantial relationship between the two of us.
  2. I review their LinkedIn Profile, content, and engagement to find evidence they are active enough on LinkedIn to justify any further engagement or messaging thru LinkedIn.
  3. If they are using LinkedIn regularly, I review their activity to discover any content I can engage on with them. I make my comment relevant to their post and I tag them to ensure they are notified I joined the conversation.
    If they are not active on LinkedIn, I move on to another LinkedIn Member or I continue seeking ways to engage with this LinkedIn Member outside of LinkedIn.
  4. If I want to connect, I will then send a LinkedIn Invite referencing the content, any substantial relevance between us and I will use the words, “Please join me on LinkedIn.”
    If I only want to message them on LinkedIn, I will use an InMail credit. I will start the conversation with something about the content, I’ll point out any substantial relevance and then I’ll let them know the reason I want to talk with them. It will never be an invite to a sales pitch. Typically I am seeking insights or knowledge I hope they have or know someone who does have.

LinkedIn is a human-to-human social engagement site. It is not a replacement for email for cold messaging.

BTW – I have built a Quora Space focused on getting you the answers to your LinkedIn questions faster. If you want access to me for all of your LinkedIn questions, please join my Quora Space – Master LinkedIn as a Business Tool

/Teddy

Categories
Webinar

2021 Webinar Series

Begin getting serious using LinkedIn as a Business Tool on February 9, 2021.

Each month I will host a 1-hour session where we introduce sales professionals, sales leaders, business owners, and executives to the real power of being serious using LinkedIn as a Business Tool.

We will discuss:

  1. Why sales professionals should use LinkedIn as a Business Tool.
  2. The top LinkedIn KPIs and what actions can improve them and your business success.
  3. Why it’s important to focus on your target audience and their influencers.
  4. The real power of Social Conversations regarding your professional brand.
  5. How Social Research (prospecting) can amplify sales efforts.
  6. The importance of Social Listening to the right audience.

These sessions are for people who want to begin using LinkedIn as a Business Tool with purpose focused on their business goals.

We will host a session at 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM EST on the second Tuesday of each month in 2021.

Register on Eventbrite today to get your ticket.

If you have any questions about the event, please don’t hesitate to contact me – 336-283-6121 or email webinars@burrissconsulting.com

Categories
LinkedIn LinkedIn Network Sales Navigator

Organic vs Influenced Referrals

We all want referrals.

We spent countless hours networking in real life in the hopes more people will get to know us and what we do and will refer us to others.

We invest time on social networking, sharing, and engaging on LinkedIn with the same hope, someone will see us and our content and refer us to others.

Doing these steps routinely can create what I call organic referrals.
However, organic referrals alone are never enough.

However, we need to execute another process – Creating Influenced referrals.

Influenced referrals are purposefully asking the influencers of our target audience to introduce us for a conversation.

We can’t create influenced referrals unless we are building our networks with both our target audience and their influencers.

This takes time and a constant set of activities of networking, engaging, and inviting these influencers into conversations.

These conversations must be focused on the influencers. Ask questions, listen, and learn about them, their roles, experiences, and anything else they are willing to share in order for us to get to know them better.

We also must be willing to help these influencers. Helping them in different ways is one of the tactics that create relationships with people who may be willing to help you. Maybe with a referral.

As you get to know these influencers and they get to know you more, in time you’ll uncover the opportunity to talk with these influencers and ask them if they could help you. You must ask if they are willing to do so.

Their positive reply is a statement not only to you but to them as well that they will help you, where relevant, appropriate and possible,  by introducing you to the person you want to get into a conversation with.

Once someone introduces you to your target audience it’s important that you return to the influencer and thank them for the introduction.

Organic referrals are truly fabulous things.

Influenced referrals are also fabulous things. And, you are more in control of the frequency and the results.

How often are you seeking influenced referrals?

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