It’s a Journey, not a Race

Teddy Burriss - Balloon in sky Journey

I’m seeing more and more advertisements for ‘instant’, ‘rapid’ and ‘easy’ automation methods or processes around using LinkedIn.

Even though these plugins, applications, extensions, services, etc may automate and speed up the use of some areas of LinkedIn, this is fact; they are all doomed to fail like a house of cards.

And, if you are not capable of running your business without these automation tools, your business could fail as well.

I make this bold statement based on two facts.

#1 – LinkedIn’s Terms of Service very clearly states you are not allowed to use any 3rd party application to automate any of the LinkedIn processes within the application. Read Section 8 of the Terms of Services completely.

#2 – LinkedIn is the 800# Gorilla who owns the application and access to the data. (You may own your LinkedIn data, just not the application that accesses it.)

None of these businesses creating these ‘unauthorized’ crawlers, browser plugins and add-ons, or any other technology, can sustain the application changes they have to keep making as LinkedIn counters their ‘attacks’ on the data and LinkedIn application.

It may cost LinkedIn lots of money to keep fending off the violators to their terms of services, however, LinkedIn’s pockets and determination are greater than the businesses who are violating LinkedIn’s terms of service.

I strongly feel it is not wise to build a business or allow my employees to build business processes using these 3rd party tools and ignoring these two points.

One of the reasons these 3rd party applications exists is as a society we seek ‘instant gratification‘.

There are many things in my life where I expect instant gratification. Turn on the water, turn on a light, fire up Apple Music, Netflix or the coffee pot.

However, getting instant results from LinkedIn is not something I expect or want. It’s not sustainable.

LinkedIn is a professional networking tool and plays an important role in relationship development when you use LinkedIn appropriately.

Networking and relationship development is a journey, not a race.

Here are 5 reasons I look at using LinkedIn as a journey, not a race.

  1. I’m a relationship sales professional. I have some level of relationship with all of my clients. I like this style of business.
  2. I like to research my Most Important Viewers in my LinkedIn network and discover more about them so I can best engage with them using words and ideas they understand. This produces some of the richest conversations for me and them.
  3. Being organic in my use of LinkedIn allows me to find new processes, tactics, and styles that fit who I am and my business. This allows me to be different than others who have automated the basic steps of LinkedIn with less personality or uniqueness.
  4. For me, it would be devastating to use an automation tool that purports instant gratification and be discovered as less than sincere, honest, or real. See point #1 again.
  5. Getting into open conversations with my LinkedIn Network has created a huge advantage for me. This takes time and has uncovered new ideas that have had a positive impact on my life and/or business.
  6. I truly enjoy fulfilling this edict every day; “Networking is finding, developing and nurturing relationships that mutually move people forward through life.”

Again, networking and relationship development is a journey, not a race. The magic is in the journey. The rewards are in the conversations I get to have along the way. The benefits are mutual when I listen and get permission to share after I discover what is important to the other person.

My last point regarding using ‘unauthorized’ applications with LinkedIn is this; I believe I have built a fantastic LinkedIn Network, one that I am blessed to have. I also have created a strong reputation across LinkedIn in regards to the work I do and it makes my phone ring.

There is no way in the world I would jeopardize this and lose access to my LinkedIn account because I want instant gratification.

Teddy

We are who we hang out with and because of our content.

Teddy Burriss - Tribe message

I recently was asked this question on Quora.com, “has LinkedIn become a toxic place or is it the same as ever?”

Let me first define Toxic: Webster says it’s Poisonous. The dumping of toxic waste. That sounds relevant to me.

I define Toxic in regards to social media, as any content filled with hate and attacking words which is detrimental to a positive society.

I don’t call content I disagree with Toxic. Just because I don’t agree does not make content toxic.

Only when it’s filled with ugliness, hatefulness, and attacking anyone or groups of people for any reason, does it get called Toxic by me.

Ok, this said, yes, LinkedIn is just as toxic as it has always been. Just like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, SnapChat, YouTube, etc, they all contain toxic content in some way or another.

It really has not changed much over time. Maybe more people adding to the toxicity and maybe a little more diversity in the toxicity. However, just as in life, hateful & attacking content has always been out there.

So, if it’s true that all social media, including LinkedIn, contains lots of toxic content, how come I almost never see any? My LinkedIn newsfeed is for the most part very enjoyable and useful.

The answer lies with us.

Our social media news feeds are filled with content from our networks that we engage on and look for. This is accomplished by the mystical news feed algorithms the social media platforms use.

They want us to see what we want to see, so we stay on their sites longer.

Think about this for a minute. Social media platforms make money when their members are viewing the newsfeed and seeing and/or clicking on the social media ads they share with us. If your newsfeed contains content that is toxic in your mind, you’ll minimize the time you spend on that site.

There are three primary reasons you are or are not seeing toxic content in your LinkedIn newsfeed.

#1 – Your LinkedIn Network, hopefully, chosen by you and you alone does not share much if any toxic content at all. Therefore, who you decide to connect with on LinkedIn will have a direct impact on the types of content you see in your newsfeed. Connect with a lot of hate spewing LinkedIn Members (and I don’t doubt they exist), and you’ll see more toxic content.

#2 – Your LinkedIn Newsfeed contains the types of content you like to engage on. I proved this a few months ago when I stopped engaging on content about LinkedIn and started searching for and engaging on content related to sales leadership. The more I shared and engaged on sales leadership content, the more my newsfeed became filled with sales leadership content. Slowly this replaced the content about LinkedIn.

Eventually, I returned my focus to content about LinkedIn and sales leadership content slowly began going away from my LinkedIn newsfeed.
This fact of ‘what you touch is what you see‘ is why I developed the edict, “Never do, say or engage on social media in any way you don’t want to be seen, heard or perceived of in life.” It’s real.

#3 – You can influence your LinkedIn newsfeed based on many different things. Hiding specific content, reporting content, unfollowing or following people or companies, viewing the newsfeed by Top or Most Recent, your LinkedIn Group activity, and following content #Hashtags, are just a few of the ways you can influence your LinkedIn newsfeed content. 

In summary, we can control the visibility of toxic content in LinkedIn by adjusting our network, the content we engage on and the activities we do on LinkedIn.

Now, will this make toxic content go away? Maybe not by the actions of a few, but I’m certain if more people were deliberate about their LinkedIn Networks and what they do on LinkedIn, the toxic content will be kept from growing even more.

We are who we hang out and what we do and say in life, as well as on LinkedIn.  

Flight or Fight on LinkedIn

Many of us have had it done to us in one way or another.

We post an article, video, image, our ideas or perspectives into a LinkedIn Post and someone jumps into our conversation with a negative, sometimes hateful comment.

When this happens we generally have one of two reactions.

The first reaction is ‘Flight’.

This reaction is where we publicly ignore the negative/hateful comments on our posts.

Dale Carnegie taught me to ‘Never Criticize, Condemn or Complain’. I believe Dale would have approved of my regular flight reaction to negative and hateful comments on social media.

To me, flight means I will never publicly respond to these comments in any way.

Sometimes I’ll delete the comment if it’s truly a hateful, disrespectful and/or irrelevant response to my post or another comment in the thread, so others in the conversation do not fuel the negative/hateful debate.

Sometimes if the responder is someone I have felt some level of trust/respect for in the past, I’ll send them a LinkedIn message and ask them to ‘please be careful when responding to my posts on LinkedIn.’ I’ll only do this twice before I block/report and un-connect from the repeat offender. I have only had to do this twice in the past 11 years. 

Even though periodically I share a post that another LinkedIn Member may disagree with, the majority of my posts on LinkedIn do not solicit negative/hateful responses. I attribute this to the professionalism of my LinkedIn Network, thank you.

My flight reaction is only in regards to comments that are hateful, disrespectful and/or ugly in nature. I won’t walk away from a comment from a LinkedIn Member that disagrees with me. This is an opportunity for creative collaboration. Sometimes I’ll show creative curiosity and ask an open-ended question in a constructive way.

The second reaction to negative/hateful comments is ‘Fight’.

This occurs when we publicly attack those who comment with negative and/or hateful words. The energy put into a fight reaction on LinkedIn can range from simple yet equally negative words to a long drawn response of negative words in an effort to show those in the conversation how wrong, ridiculous, ignorant and/or uneducated the responder feels the original commenter is.

There are a few problems with responding to negative/hateful comments in this manner.

First of all pay attention to what George Bernard Shaw said; “Never wrestle with a pig. You both get dirty and the pig likes it.”  

I was always taught, “Don’t stoop to their level, you’re better than that.” Additionally, I repeat what Dale Carnegie taught me, “Never Criticize, Condemn or Complain.

It may ‘feel good’ for a moment as you hit that Post button shouting, “Take that!”, however, this feeling is short lived and offers no value to those in the conversation.

Secondly, when you get into a ‘war of words’ with these negative/hateful commenters, you’ll kill off any worthwhile engagement on that post. Most business professionals will swipe up and away from all posts that have arguments going on in the thread. We don’t want to be found in these conversations, regardless of which side of the argument others would perceive we land on.

Another problem with the tit-for-tat response to negative/hateful comments is our network will begin to perceive that we are not much different than the commenter with the original negative/hateful words. 

I strive to live by this edict; “Never do, say or engage in any way you don’t want to be seen, heard or perceived of in life.” @TLBurriss

Also, I do not believe I am responsible to ‘call someone out publicly’ for their negative/hateful words, especially on social media. I don’t believe we can change how others feel and/or act through the words we use in a social media comment or reply. If I want to influence someone in a meaningful way I know the best way to achieve this is through a face to face or at least ear-ear conversation. Unfortunately, social media arguments are more likely to explode, not resolve because all they see are the words. Positive influence occurs through tone and body language.

The purpose of sharing all content/engagement on LinkedIn should be to encourage meaningful conversation that presents you as an authority relevant to what you shared and/or engaged on.

The ultimate goal of sharing/engaging on LinkedIn is to become trusted, respected and even liked in order for your target audience to want to engage with you in business conversations.

The moment we allow and/or encourage (via response) negative/hateful debate on our posts and comments, we are in fact destroying any business value behind those posts and comments and in many cases, negatively impacting our professional and/or personal reputation.

Choose Flight, not Fight.

What are your thoughts?

Teddy 

Purposeful LinkedIn Networking

In one way or another, you have access to nearly 610 Million people who are on LinkedIn. Even if these LinkedIn Members are not active on LinkedIn, purposefully networking on LinkedIn is a powerful way to get into the right conversations with the right people, at the right time.

I routinely remind my clients of two important business process facts of LinkedIn Networking.

#1 You do not have to connect with every Tom, Dick, and Betty on LinkedIn. No disrespect to all the Toms, Dicks and Bettys on LinkedIn, they could be fabulous people. I’ll tell them as well, not to connect with every George, Harry or Sylvia on LinkedIn either. I use a very deliberate philosophy to decide who I should connect with. Relevance is at the core of this philosophy. I use the word relevance broadly around life, business, career, community, industry, role, interest and curiosity.

#2 There are two people you should connect with on LinkedIn (and in life). I urge everyone who wants to get the greatest value from their LinkedIn Network to make a new connection every day of their life. The more you network on LinkedIn the easier it becomes to network on LinkedIn.

Many years ago LinkedIn used to show the size of our 2nd level network. Back when I only had a few thousand connections I remember this number being close to 13Million people. Today I am fortunate to have a large and highly relevant LinkedIn Network. As I research new LinkedIn Connections today it has become far easier to connect with them.

The old quote of “6 degrees from Kevin Bacon” has morphed into my quote, “2 degrees away from my Most Important Viewer”.

Here are the two people you should connect with on LinkedIn:

(A) People you can help

These are the people you could help in some way or another.

Maybe it’s your ability to encourage, motivate, inform or educate them through the content you share and the ideas you bring to relevant conversations.

Maybe you can help them through a direct conversation over a LinkedIn or email message or even a quick phone call.

Maybe you can help them by alerting them of future opportunities you discover from your LinkedIn Network that they could benefit from.

Maybe they need help connecting with that a LinkedIn Connection who could be the most profound connection and conversation they have ever made.

(B) People who can help you

These are the people who can help you in some way or another, either in business, life, community or career.

Maybe you can get encouragement, motivation or educated from their content and engagement in relevant conversations.

Maybe you can get into an open and mutually beneficial conversation with them via LinkedIn message, email, quick phone call or visit.

Maybe as your relationship and reputation grow with them, they would be able/willing to introduce you to your next great LinkedIn Connection, (i.e. a potential client).

Maybe these LinkedIn Members are actually your Most Important Viewer (target audience) and again, as your relationship and reputation grow with them, they would be open to a direct business conversation which could turn a LinkedIn Connection into a prospect or better yet a client.

You can adjust my definitions of People you can help and People who can help you as you wish to best fit your specific business or career goals. However, don’t disrespect the core definitions by driving them down to ‘people I can sell to’.

If you are not networking on LinkedIn for mutual benefit, as we should in life, I can guarantee you’ll get far less long term value from networking.

One of the truly rewarding aspects of networking with these two people on LinkedIn is that often one becomes the other. Sometimes you don’t see it happening until the person you thought needed your help introduces you to someone they know well who needs your services, products or skills. And, maybe that person you connect with who became a client, personally needs your help with their own goals.

Two additional important aspects of networking on LinkedIn, which I am committed to are:

  1. My research (searching) on LinkedIn is focused on people who can help me. This is typically influencers or my Most Important Viewer.
  2. I immediately engage with everyone I connect with on LinkedIn. I think it’s a huge missed opportunity when LinkedIn Members fail to do this.

The amount of time I invest in my immediate engagement is based on the potential value this LinkedIn Connection could have to my business goals. Often those I can help will get a friendly LinkedIn message thanking them for the connection and letting them know I will help them in any way I can. Those who I believe can help me (often the influencers or my Most Important Viewers) may get a phone call or business email message thanking them for the connection and inviting them to a conversation regarding their business goals or needs. No sales pitch, ever.

I strive to live by my edit of “Networking is finding, developing and nurturing relationships that mutually move people forward through life.” As I discovered the potential of networking on LinkedIn I encourage all LinkedIn Members to do the same.

If your sales team needs to understand and start networking on LinkedIn purposefully, let’s talk.

Teddy
336-283-6121
info@burrissconsulting.com

Are you paying attention to new LinkedIn features?

New LinkedIn Features

One of the newest features is the LinkedIn Messaging Forwarding option.

See the post I put on LinkedIn regarding this feature:

So how can you use this feature?

Here are a few ideas:

  • Capture a link to 3rd party content via messaging and share it with a peer.
  • Share a great message from a peer with someone else who can benefit from it.
  • When someone messages you an article, video, or an image, you can share it with someone else who it may be useful for.

I’m sure there will be uses that are less than mutually beneficial, and even some less than authentic or ethical forwarding of messages. This occurs every day. I tolerate this misuse, while I look for better ways of using new features.

What about you? 

Top 10 LinkedIn Changes going into 2019

Blink your eyes and LinkedIn will change.

Ok, maybe not that fast, but the application changes routinely and there is no expectation this will slow down. Actually, I expect significant changes throughout this year, some we will appreciate, some we won’t.

Here are 10 new changes you may not have noticed yet this year (2019):

#1 – LinkedIn Search results of LinkedIn Members who are ‘Connections of’ are limited to 1000, regardless of the filters you apply (or don’t).

LinkedIn says they are doing this to reduce server requirements from LinkedIn Searches.

#2 – The PYMK (People You May Know) has been redesigned into Recommendations for You.

This section of LinkedIn is still on your MyNetwork Page, below any pending invites. This section now includes People, Groups, COmpanies and Hashtags (Communities and content).

Teddy Burriss LinkedIn Recommendations for You Page

The content in these areas is displayed in a Gallery form, vs the older listing of People. More graphically appealing presentation.

#3 Group Navigation Column

LinkedIn Group NavigationWhen you are viewing any of your LinkedIn Groups, owned or just a member the left column of the LinkedIn page shows the Management button (if a manager) and your Recent as well as all LinkedIn Groups.

This makes LinkedIn Group engagement easier as you move in and out of numerous groups.

The top of the column has your LinkedIn Profile access.

The bottom of the column shows your Communities (Hashtags) and the Discovery button.

 

#4 & #5  – Email Address Privacy changes

There are two changes here.

LinkedIn Email Privacy

The first is you can make your email address visible to no one, your 1st level LinkedIn Connections, 1st & 2nd Level Connections or Anyone on LinkedIn. The default is your 1st level connections.

Email Address in LinkedIn Export

The second change is now when you export your LinkedIn Connections (alone or in the Data Archive function) you no longer get LinkedIn Member’s email addresses. LinkedIn Members have to opt-in to include their email address in this data. Only 3 of my clients opted-in to include their email address in this export.

#6 – Home Page Navigation Column

LinkedIn Home Page Nav

The left column on LinkedIn continues to change. Now you can see your entire Headline and the top three Analytics (per LinkedIn).

You also have your LinkedIn Company page access and basic analytics.

Below this is your LinkedIn Groups, most recent accessed and the entire list (via ‘show more’)

Lastly on the bottom of this navigation column are the #hashtags or LinkedIn Communities you are following.

This makes moving around LinkedIn just a little easier to do.

#7 – Group activity in your Newsfeed and Notifications

LinkedIn has committed to rejuvenating LinkedIn Groups. One task towards this goal is to include your LinkedIn Group activity in your LinkedIn Home Page Newsfeed as well as in your Notifications. Of course you could always turn this off, however, I encourage if you like the groups you are in, accept the notifications so you can engage in them.

#8 – LinkedIn Company Page Content Suggestions

LinkedIn Compay Page Mgmt

 

 

This is a rather interesting new feature of LinkedIn Company Pages. You can filter these content suggestions by Topics, Industry, Location, Function, Seniority, content from all LinkedIn Members, Page Followers, or your employees. This is a great way to find relevant and useful content for your Page followers, beyond your own content.

#9 – LinkedIn Communities

Followed HashtagsI’ve referenced #Hashtags and Communities a few times now. #Hashtags are getting new attention in LinkedIn in Posts, Articles, Company Page Posts, Comments, and even Group discussions.

I believe the term Communities is being replaced by Followed Hashtags.

If you want to be included in these topics, start using relevant #Hashtags in your posts.

I feel this functionality of LinkedIn may have some stickiness.

 

#10 – LinkedIn Search Home Page

LinkedIn Search PageIn their new theme to use gallery images, the LinkedIn Search page has three areas on it:

  1. My Connections
  2. People in my Company
  3. People who also went to the school I went to

I like the new gallery layout, easy access to their LinkedIn Profile, to send a message and see the first part of their headline and shared connections.

Pay attention to the changes occurring with LinkedIn. Some are an improvement, some may not be. However, understanding the changes and how to work with them can help you to be more efficient using LinkedIn as the application morphs.

Teddy

 

 

 

Top 10 LinkedIn Wish List for 2019

Teddy Burris LinkedIn Wish List

As an unofficial Ambassador of LinkedIn, I publicly admit to you I have a Love & dislike relationship for the application. This is not so unusual and I’m sure I’m not the only one. However, I can’t do my business without this tool, regardless of the fact that my business is teaching people how to use this tool.

Here are 10 areas of LinkedIn, that if improved upon, my appreciation for this business tool would be far greater:

#1 – Merge LinkedIn InMails and Messages into a single page for Sales Navigator users.

It’s difficult sometimes to see all the messages from a lead, especially when we used LinkedIn to send messages to Members before we began engaging with them in Sales Navigator or if we use both LinkedIn and Sales Navigator to send messages to these leads now. A single screen of messaging for a lead would be a beautiful thing

#2 – LinkedIn Groups need to either be resurrected or shut down.

I know there’s a roadmap to resurrect LinkedIn Groups. However, this conversation started nearly a year ago and there have been no serious improvements in LinkedIn Groups for Group Members. I would prefer to see LinkedIn Groups survive and create a renewed environment for engagement, ideation, networking, and collaboration. Here’s a wild idea, maybe buy Slack and integrate it into LinkedIn instead.

#3 – Company Page Followers

Give us access to our Followers again. Let us see who they are and engage with them directly. Either via LinkedIn Messages or InMails. Let LinkedIn Members opt In or Out for this messaging. Most Importantly, let us see who our followers are again.

#4 – Add Block with Ignore or Accept on LinkedIn Invites.

Many of us who network purposefully will Ignore an invite and then either months or years later get a new invite from these LinkedIn Members. Today, once we Ignore an invite we can no longer message with those LinkedIn Members who have new pending invites to us. We need this changed. One way to do this is to add Block to the LinkedIn Network Manage All page like this (Accept | Ignore | Block). Put the responsibility back on the LinkedIn Members, rather than making a decision to block invites we Ignore. Give us the ability to engage when we want with our new pending connections.

#5 – Searching ‘Connections of’ needs to be improved.

Recently (1/2019) this function of LinkedIn Search has not been working as it should be. The number of search results of our 1st level connections via ‘Connections of’ is nowhere near complete, or even close to the purported  1000 result limit. The reduced search results are far too extreme to be a result of LinkedIn Member privacy setting functions. Even with Filtering, I have experienced search results that appear incomplete with no known reason.

#6 – Increased Engagement Features on Sales Navigator.

We can Like or Comment a lead’s content from Sales Navigator. However, there are no @Mentioning options at all when commenting. Furthermore, there are no Share functions. Both of these additions would help us engage with our leads at a higher level, which is important when nurturing the relationship with these LinkedIn Members from Sales Navigator.

#7 – Expanded LinkedIn Dashboard

The LinkedIn Dashboard that displays on our LinkedIn Profile page is useful. However adding other KPIs such as Network Size, Most engaging Post, Most engaged LinkedIn Member, Most connected Company, Most connected Role and/or Industry could give better insights into our actions on LinkedIn and help us make more informed decisions.

#8 – Add Region to Company Search

I know Sales Navigator is the LinkedIn tool we should be using for our prospecting. However, I never use LinkedIn Search for Companies because it’s only by name. Adding at least Region to this search page would give us some value in this search result page.

#9 – Data Export needs improvement.

I recently downloaded all of my content using the Data Archive Feature. It was by no means a Complete download of all of my data. There were no images and no videos from either Rich Media on my LinkedIn Profile or from Posts. It appeared to only include a few months of posts and none of my data from Sales Navigator was included.  I hope we can eventually download All of our Content, especially since the LinkedIn Terms of Services say this is our content.

#10 – Share the product roadmap with us.

At the very least it would be great if LinkedIn would give us alerts when they make permanent changes to the application. Not know why something that worked yesterday does not work today can be very frustrating for many LinkedIn Members. It would be a true sign of customer appreciation if we were given even a little warning of application changes. Heck, even a blog notice about the changes (beyond huge changes) would be nice.

Again, I have a strong Love/dislike relationship with LinkedIn. I truly enjoy working with the application and training others how to get value from this business tool.

I hope some of my Top 10 items on this wishlist were considered by LinkedIn.

Teddy

12 LinkedIn Hacks of 2018

I produced a video on this topic as well.  Video 12 LinkedIn Hacks of 2018

Hacks increase our performance, productivity and the results we achieve using LinkedIn. Here are 12 Hacks I use regularly that improve my performance and results.

#1 – Headline Hack


If you are an iPhone user you can increase the number of characters in your LinkedIn Headline to approximately 220. Write your headline in a text editor, check the spelling and grammar and send it to your iPhone (text or email message). Then open your LinkedIn Profile in the LinkedIn App and Copy/Paste this text into your headline.

Note – you can not edit/save your Top Card in a Web Browser (desktop) unless you reduce the headline back to 120 characters. You’ll need to repeat the copy/paste actions on your iPhone to recover the extended headline after editing on a desktop.


#2 – Manage your Invites from the Manage Invitations page.
There are two pages you can view incoming LinkedIn Invites. The initial My Network Page and the Manage Invitations Page.

Manage all of your invitations from the Manage Invitations Page because you can do so much more from that page. You can Right Click on the profile and view it in a new tab, Accept or Ignore the invitation and most importantly Reply to the invitation request, even if you are not connected. You can also manage your sent invites from this page where you can Withdraw invite that has been out there too long.


#3 – Saved Searches


Most LinkedIn Members can have 3 saved searches of people who meet predefined search criteria. The trick to accessing LinkedIn Saved Search is to put something in the search bar and click on People in the search results window. Once you create a great saved search you will get a weekly email from LinkedIn with a list of the new LinkedIn Members who meet the search criteria.


#4 – The Power of the Three Dots


The three dots (…) is where additional options are available on posts in the newsfeed, on LinkedIn Company Pages and in LinkedIn Groups.
The tree dots (…) are also used on LinkedIn Profiles of third degree LinkedIn Members. LinkedIn currently uses More on 1st & 2nd level connections. Check out the More or three dot (…) options.


#5 – Two-Step Verification


As with many social media or online accounts, hackers are looking for ways to hack or worse, hijack your LinkedIn Account. This is a serious problem and LinkedIn, as many other platforms have has implemented Two-Step Verification to help you protect your account. In order to set up this security option go to Two-Step Verification under Settings and Privacy. Each time you access your LinkedIn account from a different device, or after you flush your browser cache, the application will text an access code to your phone.


#6 – LinkedIn Message functions

On the LinkedIn Mobile App there are new messaging features. Beyond the basics of attaching an image or an app provided GIF, you can:
A) @Mention other LinkedIn Members in your message which puts an encrypted link to their LinkedIn Profile
B) Record up to a 60 second audio recording in the message.
C) Send an address via Map in the message.
The Mobile App also saves your message drafts in the event you move away from a message you started to another LinkedIn Message (this is not completely tested yet)

The desktop and Mobile App also let you Accept or Ignore invitations from the LinkedIn members who sent you an invite after you have messaged them. (See Hack #4)


#7 – Native Video

From the Mobile App you can capture video and post to either your LinkedIn Profile (from the LinkedIn Home Page) or to any LinkedIn Company Page you manage (via the new LinkedIn Company Page Admin view).

You can switch cameras while recording and add stickers before you post the video with your text. This is a neat way to share quick video stories with your network.

Be purposeful and focus your messages on your target audience.

 


#8 Your Dashboard
View your own LinkedIn Profile and directly below the top section (called Top Card) is Your Dashboard. This is a quick view of a few key LinkedIn Stats; Profile views, the last post views and the number of times you show in LinkedIn Searches. Each of these stats includes hyperlinks to even more analytical information. It’s worth viewing a few times a month and evaluating.


#9 – Right Click is your Friend

I love using Right Click from web pages I don’t want to lose while working. Also, browser performance when you’re working from a LinkedIn Search results page is better when you right click on a result (Profile or Company page) and Open in a New Tab. Doing so keeps your list in tack and lets you perform your process on the result and then simply hit the X on the browser tab and work the next result. I often open as many as 5 new tabs from the results page before I view/work the record in the new tab.


#10 – Animated Company Page Logo

Dang – It doesn’t show as a GIF

If you want to create a little sparkle on your LinkedIn Company Page and where your company logo is displayed, you can use a GIF as your logo. Too fast of a GIF may be overly annoying, however, I think it’s at least worth exploring.

 

 


Bonus #1 – Text Expander

Maybe, not a LinkedIn Hack, but a great tool.
This little app runs on Mac and PC and has improved my performance using LinkedIn significantly. It does not violate the LinkedIn Terms of Services, however, it does save a whole bunch of keystrokes. It saves me lots of time from the snippets I create for the many repeated phrases, sentences, URLs, contact information, etc. etc.
Get your license here – My Affiliate Link


Bonus #2 – WordCloud my LinkedIn Profile

Creating a word cloud of your LinkedIn Profile is a great way to visualize the overall message you are sharing based on your keywords.
There are lots of WordCloud tools available. I’ve been using www.wordart.com for some time now and find it to be easy, flexible, and quick at producing nice looking word clouds. I can also use them in my LinkedIn Posts, Articles, Instagram Posts, Facebook Posts, and Blog posts.


Bonus #3 – I want to help where and when I can.

If you want to get more out of your investment into LinkedIn and/or Sales Navigator maybe we need to talk.

I love to help people who want to master LinkedIn as a business tool and grow their business using LinkedIn.

336-283-6121 or Skype: TLBurriss

info@burrissconsulting.com


Here are a few ideas that may help you:

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5 Ways to help others using LinkedIn

I listened to a 30 minute YouTube video from Simon Sinek today. He got me to thinking about what I am doing to grow my business.

He must have used the word “ME” a few dozen times in his speech as he worked to drive home a few important points. I feel I heard him loud and clear.

One of the points I took from Simon’s message is not really new. I’ve heard it many different times in different ways. Simon has even given this ‘message’ to me before in his other talks.

I won’t distract from the video anymore. I encourage you to go watch it yourself – Simon Sinek: If you don’t Understand People, you don’t Understand Business.

The point I took from Simon’s message that I will share here is basically; ‘How are you helping others?’

My philosophy behind LinkedIn is based on 4 areas:

  1. Presence
  2. Network
  3. Reputation
  4. Prospecting

Two of these areas of LinkedIn, as well as in life, are directly impacted by how we help others. One of the problems with our fast-paced world is we don’t allow enough time to stop and do something for others. I suffer from this challenge myself.

Here are 5 ways to help others on LinkedIn that can be quick and easy, yet very impactful for the other person:

#1 – Endorsements – We can acknowledge someone for their specific skills and experiences by simply clicking on the “+” symbol in the skills section of the LinkedIn Member. Fortunately, LinkedIn also gives us the ability to show how serious we are by asking us for a level of skill and our relationship with the LinkedIn Member when we Endorse them. This is optional for those who don’t want to click three more times.

#2 – Recommendations – If we really want to show someone how much we think of their skills, experiences and/or business value we can write a LinkedIn Recommendation for them. This way to help allows us creativity in our recommendation with personalized words.

#3 – Introductions – A powerful feature of LinkedIn is the ability to get introduced to people who can help us in our business or career journey. To help others, we could accept a request to get introduced or be proactive and consider, ‘Who should I introduce to each other today?’ This is a powerful way to help other people on LinkedIn.

#4 – Like/Comment/Share – LinkedIn Members who write and share their own content on LinkedIn are appreciative when other LinkedIn Members engage on their content in meaningful and relevant ways. A Like is one click, a Comment takes a few clicks and words and a Share may cost us 15-30 seconds. This is another powerful way to help another person on LinkedIn.

#5 – Public Accolades – LinkedIn has a feature called #Kudos built into the LinkedIn Post function. If someone did something fabulous, kind, friendly, nice, useful, etc, we can consider publicly acknowledging them with a #Kudos Post. Public acknowledgment is a great way to help others on LinkedIn.

Bonus – A few more simple ways to help others on LinkedIn using kind and friendly words include:

  • @Mention them in a relevant post or comment
  • Public acknowledgment of their birthday, career anniversary or new job/role.
  • Send them a private message when you can thanking them, encouraging them or just to say hello.
  • Call them or visit them when you are in their town and have a few moments to say hello.
  • Consider them for their skills, experiences or business services.
  • Refer or better yet, recommend them (when you can) to others who could benefit from their skills/services/products

As I wrote in my first book, “Networking for Mutual Benefit”, there are two caveats to helping others:

  1. You must Give with no Expectations. What you get from giving cannot be defined or required.
  2. Give sincerely thinking of only the other person.

As I listened to Simon’s speech I was reminded we must understanding people and care for others in order to be truly successful in our businesses and lives. The rewards from giving can not be measured by dollars or a P&L.

Do you have any other ways to help others using LinkedIn? Please share with us in the comments.

Teddy

2019 – Year of Growing

I so much want to yell out loud, “Stop wasting time trying to use LinkedIn. Get help to Master it NOW, or just close your account.”

I know the value of using LinkedIn with purpose, focused on my business goals. I wish all of the 585, 691, 334 members (as of 12/21/18 11:20 AM EST) did as well.

Imagine the missed opportunities, the wasted time connecting, pushing out content, and trolling LinkedIn Groups and the newsfeed haphazardly trying to generate business, the wrong way.

When you don’t know how to integrate a business tool into your business processes, how to use it with intention and purpose, or you don’t understand the philosophies related to social networking, your efforts trying to use LinkedIn can be a waste of time.

For this reason, we are restarting our LinkedIn Seminars immediately. We held one on 12/19/18 and it was well attended by people who said this:

“Wow, I can see how I’ve been doing this wrong for so long.” DF

“I had no idea I could do that.” PP

“This is such an eye-opener for me.” DB

“This will be a great game changer for me.” MM

and my favorite

“Dang, I can’t wait to share this with my team.” SM

If you are located anywhere near Winston-Salem NC, we want you to stop wasting time trying to use LinkedIn and join us so we can help you master this business tool.

A new session every third Wednesday of the month – 8:00 AM EST at FlyWheel Coworking, 450 Design Ave, Winston-Salem, NC 27101

Register for LinkedIn Seminar

Join us if you want to become more successful focused on your business goals.

Register for LinkedIn Seminar