5 Ways to help others using LinkedIn

I listened to a 30 minute YouTube video from Simon Sinek today. He got me to thinking about what I am doing to grow my business.

He must have used the word “ME” a few dozen times in his speech as he worked to drive home a few important points. I feel I heard him loud and clear.

One of the points I took from Simon’s message is not really new. I’ve heard it many different times in different ways. Simon has even given this ‘message’ to me before in his other talks.

I won’t distract from the video anymore. I encourage you to go watch it yourself – Simon Sinek: If you don’t Understand People, you don’t Understand Business.

The point I took from Simon’s message that I will share here is basically; ‘How are you helping others?’

My philosophy behind LinkedIn is based on 4 areas:

  1. Presence
  2. Network
  3. Reputation
  4. Prospecting

Two of these areas of LinkedIn, as well as in life, are directly impacted by how we help others. One of the problems with our fast-paced world is we don’t allow enough time to stop and do something for others. I suffer from this challenge myself.

Here are 5 ways to help others on LinkedIn that can be quick and easy, yet very impactful for the other person:

#1 – Endorsements – We can acknowledge someone for their specific skills and experiences by simply clicking on the “+” symbol in the skills section of the LinkedIn Member. Fortunately, LinkedIn also gives us the ability to show how serious we are by asking us for a level of skill and our relationship with the LinkedIn Member when we Endorse them. This is optional for those who don’t want to click three more times.

#2 – Recommendations – If we really want to show someone how much we think of their skills, experiences and/or business value we can write a LinkedIn Recommendation for them. This way to help allows us creativity in our recommendation with personalized words.

#3 – Introductions – A powerful feature of LinkedIn is the ability to get introduced to people who can help us in our business or career journey. To help others, we could accept a request to get introduced or be proactive and consider, ‘Who should I introduce to each other today?’ This is a powerful way to help other people on LinkedIn.

#4 – Like/Comment/Share – LinkedIn Members who write and share their own content on LinkedIn are appreciative when other LinkedIn Members engage on their content in meaningful and relevant ways. A Like is one click, a Comment takes a few clicks and words and a Share may cost us 15-30 seconds. This is another powerful way to help another person on LinkedIn.

#5 – Public Accolades – LinkedIn has a feature called #Kudos built into the LinkedIn Post function. If someone did something fabulous, kind, friendly, nice, useful, etc, we can consider publicly acknowledging them with a #Kudos Post. Public acknowledgment is a great way to help others on LinkedIn.

Bonus – A few more simple ways to help others on LinkedIn using kind and friendly words include:

  • @Mention them in a relevant post or comment
  • Public acknowledgment of their birthday, career anniversary or new job/role.
  • Send them a private message when you can thanking them, encouraging them or just to say hello.
  • Call them or visit them when you are in their town and have a few moments to say hello.
  • Consider them for their skills, experiences or business services.
  • Refer or better yet, recommend them (when you can) to others who could benefit from their skills/services/products

As I wrote in my first book, “Networking for Mutual Benefit”, there are two caveats to helping others:

  1. You must Give with no Expectations. What you get from giving cannot be defined or required.
  2. Give sincerely thinking of only the other person.

As I listened to Simon’s speech I was reminded we must understanding people and care for others in order to be truly successful in our businesses and lives. The rewards from giving can not be measured by dollars or a P&L.

Do you have any other ways to help others using LinkedIn? Please share with us in the comments.

Teddy

15 Best Practices of LinkedIn Networking

Networking on LinkedIn is an important practice and must be done correctly and consistently in order to create real business results.

It all starts with knowing who you want to connect with. Who, in what companies, industries, and regions?

As you connect on LinkedIn you’ll create opportunities to connect with even more people you want to connect with.

I love the old adage, “6 degrees of separation from Kevin Bacon.” This is so old school. Today it’s “3 degrees of separation from anyone who connects with purpose and intention on LinkedIn.”

I ‘preach’ this regularly and am obliged to do so again here:

“There are two people you need to connect with on LinkedIn, those you can help and those who can help you.
Consider the invites from those you can help, as you purposefully send invites to those who can help you in your business or career.”

 

  1. As you connect on LinkedIn remember to smile and be friendly. You’re networking with other real people.
  2. Follow the Dale Carnegie principle; ‘make the conversation all about the other person.”
  3. I’ve added a spin to this philosophy in my Networking for Mutual Benefit; “Make the conversation all about the other person until you get permission to talk about yourself or your business.”
  4. As you connect you never know who knows who, and who can introduce you to who. This could be considered mysterious, however, for me, it’s one of the coolest things about networking.
  5. Keep connecting, and as long as you are doing it correctly, with purpose and intention, focused on your goals, trust the magic of networking will work.
  6. Don’t just network on LinkedIn, find opportunities to meet in person or have a Skype or Phone conversation. “Digital Face to Face is better than never face to face.”
  7. People want to do business with people they trust, respect and like. Get into open conversations, this can help you achieve greater trust, respect, and relationships.
  8. Listen to what your connections say or ask. Don’t listen to respond, but rather, listen to understand first and foremost.
  9. Remember to Give to your LinkedIn Network. When you give ideas, information and/or new philosophies that are relevant to your target audience, this adds to the trust, respect, and relationship.
  10. Don’t confuse barfing out brochures and case studies as a form of Giving. Give your target audience what they want, need, & are interested in, even if it’s not about your business.
  11. Help your LinkedIn Network, including your target audience, to connect with others who can help each other. Do this with no expectations of anything in return.
  12. Pay attention to your LinkedIn Network as you continue to grow your network. Show empathy and bolster their self-esteem when and where you can. You will always be remembered for caring for your network.
  13. If you lead with Give and care for your network, they will be acceptable to introduce you to others who you need meet. Ask for introductions when you can.
  14. Pay attention to who your network is connected to, and to whom they can introduce you to. Again, as you get permission, ask for appropriate introductions.
  15. Networking is a life style, not something you do once a week or when an urgent need arises.

I discovered years ago that my Network is my most important asset in life. This includes my LinkedIn Network.

Never disrespect your LinkedIn Network, continuously build your LinkedIn Network, develop a diverse LinkedIn Network, help your LinkedIn Network, care for your LinkedIn Network, share your LinkedIn Network and Give to your LinkedIn Network with no expectations.

It’ll return great dividends if you do.

Read more of my articles about Networking on LinkedIn on my blog

If I can help you and/or your team with your LinkedIn Networking practices, let’s talk.

/Teddy

336-283-6121

Should I begin using LinkedIn as a Senior in High School?

The answer to this question is similar to another question:
 
Should I start saving money in high school? 
Yes, you should start saving what money you can as early as you can.
 
Look what $1000 a year can create if you start investing at 16 yrs old. 
Base on a simple 5% APR.
 
At age 22 – $8300 in the account. At 35 – $34,000, and at 65 – $222,000.
Imagine if the APR were closer to 10%, the result would be closer to $1.4M at age 65.
 
Financial advisors will tell us to follow these best practices for the greatest financial results:
 
  • Start investing as early as we can
  • Consistently add to the funds
  • Manage the risks relevant to our goals
  • Diversify our investments
  • Reinvest the interest
  • Measure our results
 
A financial asset and a LinkedIn network are two different types of assets, however, managed correctly they are both important assets in life. There are great similarities in the best practices of these two assets.
 
As a LinkedIn consultant, I offer these best practices of Networking on LinkedIn:
 
  • Start as early as you can. 
  • Consistently grow your LinkedIn Network every day.
  • Manage the risk by making purposeful decisions of who you connect with.
  • Diversity your connections beyond your current role/career.
  • Reinvest in your network by helping your network when and where you can.
  • Measure your network to ensure you are actually building a mutually beneficial network.
Grow your LinkedIn through every phase of your career and business.

Starting early with these best practices can create the greatest value in your life if you are purposeful and deliberate in your actions.

 
If however, you are going to start building your LinkedIn Network in high school you will want to commit to the process, otherwise, your LinkedIn Network will become stale and become disconnected, just as our high school friends become when we lose track of them in life. I recommend installing the LinkedIn App on your smartphone and use it at least a few times each month as you begin networking on LinkedIn.
 
The more you connect on LinkedIn the more chances you’ll have to find ideas and philosophies that can help you in your career journey.
 
The more you connect on LinkedIn and engage with your network in meaningful ways, the more you can grow your personal/professional brand. 
 
Here are a few examples of value:
 
  • LinkedIn helps you stay in touch with the career journeys of the people you meet in real high school and beyond.
  • LinkedIn helps you to meet new people through your existing network.
  • LinkedIn can help you discover new career ideas as you start and travel through your career journey.
  • LinkedIn can help you uncover new ideas and sources of knowledge through the people in your growing network.
  • LinkedIn can help you stay aware of industries, companies, and people you are interested in.
  • LinkedIn can help you to be discovered through your 1st and 2nd level connections as an authority in the space you want to be known for.
 
I am an advocate of starting to grow your LinkedIn network before you leave high school. Deliberately begin to use LinkedIn with purpose and focus on your career and business goals.
The return on investment can be significant.
 
If you want to discuss this philosophy further, contact me – info@BurrissConsulting.com or 336-283-6121