Top 10 LinkedIn Changes going into 2019

Blink your eyes and LinkedIn will change.

Ok, maybe not that fast, but the application changes routinely and there is no expectation this will slow down. Actually, I expect significant changes throughout this year, some we will appreciate, some we won’t.

Here are 10 new changes you may not have noticed yet this year (2019):

#1 – LinkedIn Search results of LinkedIn Members who are ‘Connections of’ are limited to 1000, regardless of the filters you apply (or don’t).

LinkedIn says they are doing this to reduce server requirements from LinkedIn Searches.

#2 – The PYMK (People You May Know) has been redesigned into Recommendations for You.

This section of LinkedIn is still on your MyNetwork Page, below any pending invites. This section now includes People, Groups, COmpanies and Hashtags (Communities and content).

Teddy Burriss LinkedIn Recommendations for You Page

The content in these areas is displayed in a Gallery form, vs the older listing of People. More graphically appealing presentation.

#3 Group Navigation Column

LinkedIn Group NavigationWhen you are viewing any of your LinkedIn Groups, owned or just a member the left column of the LinkedIn page shows the Management button (if a manager) and your Recent as well as all LinkedIn Groups.

This makes LinkedIn Group engagement easier as you move in and out of numerous groups.

The top of the column has your LinkedIn Profile access.

The bottom of the column shows your Communities (Hashtags) and the Discovery button.

 

#4 & #5  – Email Address Privacy changes

There are two changes here.

LinkedIn Email Privacy

The first is you can make your email address visible to no one, your 1st level LinkedIn Connections, 1st & 2nd Level Connections or Anyone on LinkedIn. The default is your 1st level connections.

Email Address in LinkedIn Export

The second change is now when you export your LinkedIn Connections (alone or in the Data Archive function) you no longer get LinkedIn Member’s email addresses. LinkedIn Members have to opt-in to include their email address in this data. Only 3 of my clients opted-in to include their email address in this export.

#6 – Home Page Navigation Column

LinkedIn Home Page Nav

The left column on LinkedIn continues to change. Now you can see your entire Headline and the top three Analytics (per LinkedIn).

You also have your LinkedIn Company page access and basic analytics.

Below this is your LinkedIn Groups, most recent accessed and the entire list (via ‘show more’)

Lastly on the bottom of this navigation column are the #hashtags or LinkedIn Communities you are following.

This makes moving around LinkedIn just a little easier to do.

#7 – Group activity in your Newsfeed and Notifications

LinkedIn has committed to rejuvenating LinkedIn Groups. One task towards this goal is to include your LinkedIn Group activity in your LinkedIn Home Page Newsfeed as well as in your Notifications. Of course you could always turn this off, however, I encourage if you like the groups you are in, accept the notifications so you can engage in them.

#8 – LinkedIn Company Page Content Suggestions

LinkedIn Compay Page Mgmt

 

 

This is a rather interesting new feature of LinkedIn Company Pages. You can filter these content suggestions by Topics, Industry, Location, Function, Seniority, content from all LinkedIn Members, Page Followers, or your employees. This is a great way to find relevant and useful content for your Page followers, beyond your own content.

#9 – LinkedIn Communities

Followed HashtagsI’ve referenced #Hashtags and Communities a few times now. #Hashtags are getting new attention in LinkedIn in Posts, Articles, Company Page Posts, Comments, and even Group discussions.

I believe the term Communities is being replaced by Followed Hashtags.

If you want to be included in these topics, start using relevant #Hashtags in your posts.

I feel this functionality of LinkedIn may have some stickiness.

 

#10 – LinkedIn Search Home Page

LinkedIn Search PageIn their new theme to use gallery images, the LinkedIn Search page has three areas on it:

  1. My Connections
  2. People in my Company
  3. People who also went to the school I went to

I like the new gallery layout, easy access to their LinkedIn Profile, to send a message and see the first part of their headline and shared connections.

Pay attention to the changes occurring with LinkedIn. Some are an improvement, some may not be. However, understanding the changes and how to work with them can help you to be more efficient using LinkedIn as the application morphs.

Teddy

 

 

 

Top 10 LinkedIn Wish List for 2019

Teddy Burris LinkedIn Wish List

As an unofficial Ambassador of LinkedIn, I publicly admit to you I have a Love & dislike relationship for the application. This is not so unusual and I’m sure I’m not the only one. However, I can’t do my business without this tool, regardless of the fact that my business is teaching people how to use this tool.

Here are 10 areas of LinkedIn, that if improved upon, my appreciation for this business tool would be far greater:

#1 – Merge LinkedIn InMails and Messages into a single page for Sales Navigator users.

It’s difficult sometimes to see all the messages from a lead, especially when we used LinkedIn to send messages to Members before we began engaging with them in Sales Navigator or if we use both LinkedIn and Sales Navigator to send messages to these leads now. A single screen of messaging for a lead would be a beautiful thing

#2 – LinkedIn Groups need to either be resurrected or shut down.

I know there’s a roadmap to resurrect LinkedIn Groups. However, this conversation started nearly a year ago and there have been no serious improvements in LinkedIn Groups for Group Members. I would prefer to see LinkedIn Groups survive and create a renewed environment for engagement, ideation, networking, and collaboration. Here’s a wild idea, maybe buy Slack and integrate it into LinkedIn instead.

#3 – Company Page Followers

Give us access to our Followers again. Let us see who they are and engage with them directly. Either via LinkedIn Messages or InMails. Let LinkedIn Members opt In or Out for this messaging. Most Importantly, let us see who our followers are again.

#4 – Add Block with Ignore or Accept on LinkedIn Invites.

Many of us who network purposefully will Ignore an invite and then either months or years later get a new invite from these LinkedIn Members. Today, once we Ignore an invite we can no longer message with those LinkedIn Members who have new pending invites to us. We need this changed. One way to do this is to add Block to the LinkedIn Network Manage All page like this (Accept | Ignore | Block). Put the responsibility back on the LinkedIn Members, rather than making a decision to block invites we Ignore. Give us the ability to engage when we want with our new pending connections.

#5 – Searching ‘Connections of’ needs to be improved.

Recently (1/2019) this function of LinkedIn Search has not been working as it should be. The number of search results of our 1st level connections via ‘Connections of’ is nowhere near complete, or even close to the purported  1000 result limit. The reduced search results are far too extreme to be a result of LinkedIn Member privacy setting functions. Even with Filtering, I have experienced search results that appear incomplete with no known reason.

#6 – Increased Engagement Features on Sales Navigator.

We can Like or Comment a lead’s content from Sales Navigator. However, there are no @Mentioning options at all when commenting. Furthermore, there are no Share functions. Both of these additions would help us engage with our leads at a higher level, which is important when nurturing the relationship with these LinkedIn Members from Sales Navigator.

#7 – Expanded LinkedIn Dashboard

The LinkedIn Dashboard that displays on our LinkedIn Profile page is useful. However adding other KPIs such as Network Size, Most engaging Post, Most engaged LinkedIn Member, Most connected Company, Most connected Role and/or Industry could give better insights into our actions on LinkedIn and help us make more informed decisions.

#8 – Add Region to Company Search

I know Sales Navigator is the LinkedIn tool we should be using for our prospecting. However, I never use LinkedIn Search for Companies because it’s only by name. Adding at least Region to this search page would give us some value in this search result page.

#9 – Data Export needs improvement.

I recently downloaded all of my content using the Data Archive Feature. It was by no means a Complete download of all of my data. There were no images and no videos from either Rich Media on my LinkedIn Profile or from Posts. It appeared to only include a few months of posts and none of my data from Sales Navigator was included.  I hope we can eventually download All of our Content, especially since the LinkedIn Terms of Services say this is our content.

#10 – Share the product roadmap with us.

At the very least it would be great if LinkedIn would give us alerts when they make permanent changes to the application. Not know why something that worked yesterday does not work today can be very frustrating for many LinkedIn Members. It would be a true sign of customer appreciation if we were given even a little warning of application changes. Heck, even a blog notice about the changes (beyond huge changes) would be nice.

Again, I have a strong Love/dislike relationship with LinkedIn. I truly enjoy working with the application and training others how to get value from this business tool.

I hope some of my Top 10 items on this wishlist were considered by LinkedIn.

Teddy

2018 Manger Report

Annual manger report

Annually I do a Manger Report, focused on blunt spelling errors I find on LinkedIn Profiles.

I try to contact my 1st level connections to alert those I know who have Manger in their LinkedIn Profile before publishing this article.

I found 206,266 LinkedIn Profiles with the word Manger in their current title field, and this year I excluded the LinkedIn Profiles with the French term “garde manger” in the title field as I learned these are ‘keepers of the food.’

Garge Manger

Have you reviewed the spelling and grammar you used in your LinkedIn Profile? I encourage doing this.

I use Grammarly on my computers. this little app or chrome plugin does a dang good job of helping me not make ridiculous mistakes when writing online including in my LinkedIn Profile.

Here are a few of the typos I found in the title fields of LinkedIn Profiles for this article:

  • manger – 206,266 (excluding “garde manger”)
  • busines – 10770
  • profesor (United States Only) – 2989
  • admistration – 1783
  • enginner – 38301
  • enginer – 22437
  • engneer – 9039
  • enginneer – 3447
  • consultan – 377
  • cosultant –6535
  • consultent – 177
  • conultant – 137
  • represenative – 47
  • representaive – 4
  • repesentative – 695
  • excutive – 53987
  • exceutive – 3451
  • exeutive – 1818
  • presdent – 1389
  • vce President – 55
  • ownr – 412
  • dirctor – 5743
  • contrller – 209
  • resorces – 776
  • techer – 6240
  • englsh teacher” – 41
  • ambassdor – 795

Here are a few absolutely ridiculous titles for you to maybe giggle at:

  • “F*** UP” – 26
  • Jerk – 1407
  • Idiot – 1203
  • A**Hole – 689
  • “Fool” – 591
  • Jerk – 1406
  • Unemployed – 236803 (a lack of knowledge of branding yourself)
  • JackA** – 133
  • DumbA** – 176

How about a few quite ignorant last names:

  • F***er – 100
  • SH**Head – 22
  • Jerk – 175
  • A**Hole – 27

I decided not to search for any others. I get it, there are people who built a LinkedIn Profile with no real purpose or goal in mind. Some consider it all a big joke. I can give these people a pass on their ignorance. Or should I?

Branding includes putting some effort into spelling, grammar and your messaging.

Have a fabulous 2019 & Beyond folks

/Teddy

12 LinkedIn Hacks of 2018

I produced a video on this topic as well.  Video 12 LinkedIn Hacks of 2018

Hacks increase our performance, productivity and the results we achieve using LinkedIn. Here are 12 Hacks I use regularly that improve my performance and results.

#1 – Headline Hack


If you are an iPhone user you can increase the number of characters in your LinkedIn Headline to approximately 220. Write your headline in a text editor, check the spelling and grammar and send it to your iPhone (text or email message). Then open your LinkedIn Profile in the LinkedIn App and Copy/Paste this text into your headline.

Note – you can not edit/save your Top Card in a Web Browser (desktop) unless you reduce the headline back to 120 characters. You’ll need to repeat the copy/paste actions on your iPhone to recover the extended headline after editing on a desktop.


#2 – Manage your Invites from the Manage Invitations page.
There are two pages you can view incoming LinkedIn Invites. The initial My Network Page and the Manage Invitations Page.

Manage all of your invitations from the Manage Invitations Page because you can do so much more from that page. You can Right Click on the profile and view it in a new tab, Accept or Ignore the invitation and most importantly Reply to the invitation request, even if you are not connected. You can also manage your sent invites from this page where you can Withdraw invite that has been out there too long.


#3 – Saved Searches


Most LinkedIn Members can have 3 saved searches of people who meet predefined search criteria. The trick to accessing LinkedIn Saved Search is to put something in the search bar and click on People in the search results window. Once you create a great saved search you will get a weekly email from LinkedIn with a list of the new LinkedIn Members who meet the search criteria.


#4 – The Power of the Three Dots


The three dots (…) is where additional options are available on posts in the newsfeed, on LinkedIn Company Pages and in LinkedIn Groups.
The tree dots (…) are also used on LinkedIn Profiles of third degree LinkedIn Members. LinkedIn currently uses More on 1st & 2nd level connections. Check out the More or three dot (…) options.


#5 – Two-Step Verification


As with many social media or online accounts, hackers are looking for ways to hack or worse, hijack your LinkedIn Account. This is a serious problem and LinkedIn, as many other platforms have has implemented Two-Step Verification to help you protect your account. In order to set up this security option go to Two-Step Verification under Settings and Privacy. Each time you access your LinkedIn account from a different device, or after you flush your browser cache, the application will text an access code to your phone.


#6 – LinkedIn Message functions

On the LinkedIn Mobile App there are new messaging features. Beyond the basics of attaching an image or an app provided GIF, you can:
A) @Mention other LinkedIn Members in your message which puts an encrypted link to their LinkedIn Profile
B) Record up to a 60 second audio recording in the message.
C) Send an address via Map in the message.
The Mobile App also saves your message drafts in the event you move away from a message you started to another LinkedIn Message (this is not completely tested yet)

The desktop and Mobile App also let you Accept or Ignore invitations from the LinkedIn members who sent you an invite after you have messaged them. (See Hack #4)


#7 – Native Video

From the Mobile App you can capture video and post to either your LinkedIn Profile (from the LinkedIn Home Page) or to any LinkedIn Company Page you manage (via the new LinkedIn Company Page Admin view).

You can switch cameras while recording and add stickers before you post the video with your text. This is a neat way to share quick video stories with your network.

Be purposeful and focus your messages on your target audience.

 


#8 Your Dashboard
View your own LinkedIn Profile and directly below the top section (called Top Card) is Your Dashboard. This is a quick view of a few key LinkedIn Stats; Profile views, the last post views and the number of times you show in LinkedIn Searches. Each of these stats includes hyperlinks to even more analytical information. It’s worth viewing a few times a month and evaluating.


#9 – Right Click is your Friend

I love using Right Click from web pages I don’t want to lose while working. Also, browser performance when you’re working from a LinkedIn Search results page is better when you right click on a result (Profile or Company page) and Open in a New Tab. Doing so keeps your list in tack and lets you perform your process on the result and then simply hit the X on the browser tab and work the next result. I often open as many as 5 new tabs from the results page before I view/work the record in the new tab.


#10 – Animated Company Page Logo

Dang – It doesn’t show as a GIF

If you want to create a little sparkle on your LinkedIn Company Page and where your company logo is displayed, you can use a GIF as your logo. Too fast of a GIF may be overly annoying, however, I think it’s at least worth exploring.

 

 


Bonus #1 – Text Expander

Maybe, not a LinkedIn Hack, but a great tool.
This little app runs on Mac and PC and has improved my performance using LinkedIn significantly. It does not violate the LinkedIn Terms of Services, however, it does save a whole bunch of keystrokes. It saves me lots of time from the snippets I create for the many repeated phrases, sentences, URLs, contact information, etc. etc.
Get your license here – My Affiliate Link


Bonus #2 – WordCloud my LinkedIn Profile

Creating a word cloud of your LinkedIn Profile is a great way to visualize the overall message you are sharing based on your keywords.
There are lots of WordCloud tools available. I’ve been using www.wordart.com for some time now and find it to be easy, flexible, and quick at producing nice looking word clouds. I can also use them in my LinkedIn Posts, Articles, Instagram Posts, Facebook Posts, and Blog posts.


Bonus #3 – I want to help where and when I can.

If you want to get more out of your investment into LinkedIn and/or Sales Navigator maybe we need to talk.

I love to help people who want to master LinkedIn as a business tool and grow their business using LinkedIn.

336-283-6121 or Skype: TLBurriss

info@burrissconsulting.com


Here are a few ideas that may help you:

Get my Free Ebook gift and Follow my blog
Subscribe to my YouTube Channel for lots of videos on LinkedIn tips, tricks, best practices, hacks.
Follow me on Quora. Weekly I answer questions about LinkedIn.

5 Ways to help others using LinkedIn

I listened to a 30 minute YouTube video from Simon Sinek today. He got me to thinking about what I am doing to grow my business.

He must have used the word “ME” a few dozen times in his speech as he worked to drive home a few important points. I feel I heard him loud and clear.

One of the points I took from Simon’s message is not really new. I’ve heard it many different times in different ways. Simon has even given this ‘message’ to me before in his other talks.

I won’t distract from the video anymore. I encourage you to go watch it yourself – Simon Sinek: If you don’t Understand People, you don’t Understand Business.

The point I took from Simon’s message that I will share here is basically; ‘How are you helping others?’

My philosophy behind LinkedIn is based on 4 areas:

  1. Presence
  2. Network
  3. Reputation
  4. Prospecting

Two of these areas of LinkedIn, as well as in life, are directly impacted by how we help others. One of the problems with our fast-paced world is we don’t allow enough time to stop and do something for others. I suffer from this challenge myself.

Here are 5 ways to help others on LinkedIn that can be quick and easy, yet very impactful for the other person:

#1 – Endorsements – We can acknowledge someone for their specific skills and experiences by simply clicking on the “+” symbol in the skills section of the LinkedIn Member. Fortunately, LinkedIn also gives us the ability to show how serious we are by asking us for a level of skill and our relationship with the LinkedIn Member when we Endorse them. This is optional for those who don’t want to click three more times.

#2 – Recommendations – If we really want to show someone how much we think of their skills, experiences and/or business value we can write a LinkedIn Recommendation for them. This way to help allows us creativity in our recommendation with personalized words.

#3 – Introductions – A powerful feature of LinkedIn is the ability to get introduced to people who can help us in our business or career journey. To help others, we could accept a request to get introduced or be proactive and consider, ‘Who should I introduce to each other today?’ This is a powerful way to help other people on LinkedIn.

#4 – Like/Comment/Share – LinkedIn Members who write and share their own content on LinkedIn are appreciative when other LinkedIn Members engage on their content in meaningful and relevant ways. A Like is one click, a Comment takes a few clicks and words and a Share may cost us 15-30 seconds. This is another powerful way to help another person on LinkedIn.

#5 – Public Accolades – LinkedIn has a feature called #Kudos built into the LinkedIn Post function. If someone did something fabulous, kind, friendly, nice, useful, etc, we can consider publicly acknowledging them with a #Kudos Post. Public acknowledgment is a great way to help others on LinkedIn.

Bonus – A few more simple ways to help others on LinkedIn using kind and friendly words include:

  • @Mention them in a relevant post or comment
  • Public acknowledgment of their birthday, career anniversary or new job/role.
  • Send them a private message when you can thanking them, encouraging them or just to say hello.
  • Call them or visit them when you are in their town and have a few moments to say hello.
  • Consider them for their skills, experiences or business services.
  • Refer or better yet, recommend them (when you can) to others who could benefit from their skills/services/products

As I wrote in my first book, “Networking for Mutual Benefit”, there are two caveats to helping others:

  1. You must Give with no Expectations. What you get from giving cannot be defined or required.
  2. Give sincerely thinking of only the other person.

As I listened to Simon’s speech I was reminded we must understanding people and care for others in order to be truly successful in our businesses and lives. The rewards from giving can not be measured by dollars or a P&L.

Do you have any other ways to help others using LinkedIn? Please share with us in the comments.

Teddy

2019 Word of the Year

Yearly I put thought into a new Word of the Year.

These words become part of my year and help keep me on track of my goals in many different ways. They are never intended to disrupt me in any big way, but rather to help me along on my journey.

I encourage you to consider a word or phrase for yourself, on your own journey through life. Do you have a word that guides you as well?

This word has popped up in numerous conversations over the past few months and I can see how it will provide value for me in 2019 and beyond.

Webster defined Wondering as “desire or be curious to know something” as well as “feel admiration and amazement; marvel.”

Both of these definitions are applicable to my desire to wonder more as I journey forward in life. I want to continue to discover more knowledge and perspectives. I also enjoy admiring and being amazed by great things, words, events, and fabulous people in my life.

I intend to be #Deliberate as I apply this word of the year with #Purpose, #Focused on my goals as I execute the #Actions needed to be successful and show #Gratitude for my life.

Teddy

 

Previous Words of the Year:

2018 – Action

2017 – Gratitude

2016 – Purpose

2015 – Focus

2014 – Deliberate

2013 – #NoLimit

 

2019 – Year of Growing

I so much want to yell out loud, “Stop wasting time trying to use LinkedIn. Get help to Master it NOW, or just close your account.”

I know the value of using LinkedIn with purpose, focused on my business goals. I wish all of the 585, 691, 334 members (as of 12/21/18 11:20 AM EST) did as well.

Imagine the missed opportunities, the wasted time connecting, pushing out content, and trolling LinkedIn Groups and the newsfeed haphazardly trying to generate business, the wrong way.

When you don’t know how to integrate a business tool into your business processes, how to use it with intention and purpose, or you don’t understand the philosophies related to social networking, your efforts trying to use LinkedIn can be a waste of time.

For this reason, we are restarting our LinkedIn Seminars immediately. We held one on 12/19/18 and it was well attended by people who said this:

“Wow, I can see how I’ve been doing this wrong for so long.” DF

“I had no idea I could do that.” PP

“This is such an eye-opener for me.” DB

“This will be a great game changer for me.” MM

and my favorite

“Dang, I can’t wait to share this with my team.” SM

If you are located anywhere near Winston-Salem NC, we want you to stop wasting time trying to use LinkedIn and join us so we can help you master this business tool.

A new session every third Wednesday of the month – 8:00 AM EST at FlyWheel Coworking, 450 Design Ave, Winston-Salem, NC 27101

Register for LinkedIn Seminar

Join us if you want to become more successful focused on your business goals.

Register for LinkedIn Seminar

 

Lead with Give when using LinkedIn

Recently someone asked me, what do you mean by “Lead with Give” and how does it help you grow your business.

I am very purposeful to focus my Lead with Give activities on my Most Important Viewers, i.e. my target audience. However, whenever possible I will use these philosophies and tactics with anyone in my LinkedIn Network.

I started developing this philosophy after studying Dale Carnegie’s book How to Win Friends and Influence People.

A few of Dale Carnegie’s principles that impacted me in a positive way, outlined in his book, are;

Principle #2Give honest, sincere appreciation. This is a form of giving that’s easily applied to LinkedIn. One way I do this is with my first message after we connect. I always thank my new connection for accepting my invite or sending me an invite to connect. I also use sincere appreciation after receiving endorsements, recommendations, and introductions.

Principle #4Become genuinely interested in the other person. In LinkedIn, this can be done by purposefully reviewing your new connection’s Profile, and/or asking them questions about themselves, their business role and/or their business in a phone call, coffee meeting and/or in a message. This is an easy way to give.

Principle #6 – Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. When you use someone’s name in the conversation, even in your messaging, it shows you care enough to address them properly. When you message on LinkedIn use their name. When you are in a phone or face-face conversation confirm the pronunciation of their name if you are even the slightest unsure. It’s a simple, but a purposeful way of giving.

Principle #7 – Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves. Encouraging your LinkedIn Connection to share about themselves, their role and their business show’s you care about them beyond simply a connection. This is easily done with your LinkedIn Connections in a phone conversation and or in person.

Principle #8 – Talk in terms of the other person’s interests. How do you feel when a LinkedIn Connection jumps into the conversation or messaging, all about themselves, before you even inquire about them or their business? It can be frustrating. Rather than be this person, start the conversation in context to your LinkedIn Connection and you’ll quickly get permission to talk about your self and/or your business. This is another simple way to give using LinkedIn.

Principle #9 – Make the other person feel important – and do it sincerely. Being attentive, listening to understand and asking your LinkedIn Connection open-ended questions is an easy way to make your LinkedIn connection feel important. Doing so can lead them to reciprocate as well.

I’ve also incorporated other tactics into my “Lead with Give” philosophy when using LinkedIn. Here are a few:

A – Pay attention to your target audience’s birthdays and their career pivots. Not everyone’s, just your Most Important Viewers. Send them a direct message, call them or send a card when appropriate. Most of your LinkedIn Connections will be appreciative of this.

– Engage on your Most Important Viewers content where relevant. Those of us who share stuff on LinkedIn appreciate having our content Liked, Commented on and/or Shared forward.

C – Share content your LinkedIn Network will find useful and interesting. Not just about your business or products/services. When you bring content and/or a relevant conversation to LinkedIn, your Most Important Viewers will be appreciative.

D– Introduce your LinkedIn Network to each other when relevant and mutually beneficial. We all love to be introduced to others when we can find potential benefit from the introduction.

E– Invite your Most Important Viewers to lunch, coffee or after work networking events when appropriate. Moving the LinkedIn Connection to IRL (in real life) is a powerful way to network and give.

F– Alert your Most Important Viewers to the upcoming community and industry events. Especially when they can benefit from the events.

When you “Lead with Give” using LinkedIn, it develops trust, respect and even to some degree Like, from your LinkedIn Network. These relationship-building activities are what create new and uncover hidden opportunities for us.

Lead with Give as often as you can when using LinkedIn as a business tool.  It can create great rewards and feels good to do as well.

I hope this article is helpful to you.

/Teddy

15 Best Practices of LinkedIn Networking

Networking on LinkedIn is an important practice and must be done correctly and consistently in order to create real business results.

It all starts with knowing who you want to connect with. Who, in what companies, industries, and regions?

As you connect on LinkedIn you’ll create opportunities to connect with even more people you want to connect with.

I love the old adage, “6 degrees of separation from Kevin Bacon.” This is so old school. Today it’s “3 degrees of separation from anyone who connects with purpose and intention on LinkedIn.”

I ‘preach’ this regularly and am obliged to do so again here:

“There are two people you need to connect with on LinkedIn, those you can help and those who can help you.
Consider the invites from those you can help, as you purposefully send invites to those who can help you in your business or career.”

 

  1. As you connect on LinkedIn remember to smile and be friendly. You’re networking with other real people.
  2. Follow the Dale Carnegie principle; ‘make the conversation all about the other person.”
  3. I’ve added a spin to this philosophy in my Networking for Mutual Benefit; “Make the conversation all about the other person until you get permission to talk about yourself or your business.”
  4. As you connect you never know who knows who, and who can introduce you to who. This could be considered mysterious, however, for me, it’s one of the coolest things about networking.
  5. Keep connecting, and as long as you are doing it correctly, with purpose and intention, focused on your goals, trust the magic of networking will work.
  6. Don’t just network on LinkedIn, find opportunities to meet in person or have a Skype or Phone conversation. “Digital Face to Face is better than never face to face.”
  7. People want to do business with people they trust, respect and like. Get into open conversations, this can help you achieve greater trust, respect, and relationships.
  8. Listen to what your connections say or ask. Don’t listen to respond, but rather, listen to understand first and foremost.
  9. Remember to Give to your LinkedIn Network. When you give ideas, information and/or new philosophies that are relevant to your target audience, this adds to the trust, respect, and relationship.
  10. Don’t confuse barfing out brochures and case studies as a form of Giving. Give your target audience what they want, need, & are interested in, even if it’s not about your business.
  11. Help your LinkedIn Network, including your target audience, to connect with others who can help each other. Do this with no expectations of anything in return.
  12. Pay attention to your LinkedIn Network as you continue to grow your network. Show empathy and bolster their self-esteem when and where you can. You will always be remembered for caring for your network.
  13. If you lead with Give and care for your network, they will be acceptable to introduce you to others who you need meet. Ask for introductions when you can.
  14. Pay attention to who your network is connected to, and to whom they can introduce you to. Again, as you get permission, ask for appropriate introductions.
  15. Networking is a life style, not something you do once a week or when an urgent need arises.

I discovered years ago that my Network is my most important asset in life. This includes my LinkedIn Network.

Never disrespect your LinkedIn Network, continuously build your LinkedIn Network, develop a diverse LinkedIn Network, help your LinkedIn Network, care for your LinkedIn Network, share your LinkedIn Network and Give to your LinkedIn Network with no expectations.

It’ll return great dividends if you do.

Read more of my articles about Networking on LinkedIn on my blog

If I can help you and/or your team with your LinkedIn Networking practices, let’s talk.

/Teddy

336-283-6121