What does your title say to your LinkedIn Network – LinkedIn Original Article

On LinkedIn your Title is one of the key pieces of content on your Profile.

I originally published this article on LinkedIn – Read it here: What does you Title say to your LinkedIn Network

It is the third piece of content that LinkedIn search uses when members are looking for new connections, business partners or candidates.

What does your LinkedIn Title say about you?

I exported my LinkedIn listing and summarized the number of times specific Job Titles showed up.

The table below breaks down all of the Titles that showed up 5 or more times in my connection list All others are grouped together in the “Everything Else” count.

Count – Title

331 – Blank
164 – Owner
116 – President
55 – President & CEO
53 – Executive Director
30 – Business Dev Mgr
25 – Principal
24 – Vice President
24 – Account Executive
26 – Consultant
18 – Partner
18 – Founder
15 – Project Manager
12- Chief Operating Officer
11 – Sales Manager
11 – Marketing Manager
11 – HR Manager
11 – General Manager
10 – IT Manager
10 – Sales Representative
9 – Operations Manager
9 – Managing Director
9 – Manager
9 – CFO
9 – Board member
9 – Adjunct Faculty
8 – Office Manager
8 – Controller
7 – Sales
7 – Managing Partner
7 – Dir of Business Dev
7 – Business Analyst
7 – Branch Manager
6 – Systems Administrator
6 – Financial Advisor
6 – Broker
6 – Administrative Assistant
6 – Accountant
5 – Sr. Project Manager
5 – Regional Sales Manager
5 – Real Estate Broker
5 – Marketing Coordinator
5 – Independent Consultant
5 – Executive Assistant
5 – Director of Sales
5 – Director of Operations
5 – Director of Marketing
5 – Career Facilitator
2540 – Everything Else

Usually people use LinkedIn for one of two primary reasons

#1 reason – You are searching for a new JobHopefully you have a LinkedIn profile for one of two primary reasons:

#2 reason – You have a good career and want to connect with others relevant to who you are and what you do.

What does your current Job Title say about you? If you are looking for a job, how does it help the recruiters, hiring managers or business owners who are looking at your LinkedIn profile as they look for new employees?

If you have a job, how does your current Job Title help the people you are connecting with and want to connect with in business?

Having a “Blank” job title is just a plain waste of digital space. This should not occur.

For the rest of my LinkedIn connections, why not use this digital space to say something compelling, customer beneficial or even interesting?

I totally respect all of my “Owner”, “President” and “CEO” LinkedIn connections, however consider using this space to let your customers know even more about your value to them.

I can’t craft a job title for all of these folks, however what I can do is to get you to think of another way of presenting yourself on LinkedIn.

Show your authority as the Owner, President or CEO, but consider leading with something that shows how much you care about your customers, industry, market, etc. Show your passion and desire to be a valuable resource to the people who see your LinkedIn Profile.

Consider standing out a little bit from all of the other Owners, Presidents, CEOs, Branch Managers, etc.

A friend of mine is a what many would call a Sales Trainer. His LinkedIn profile Job Position says, “Sales & Management Coach, Trainer and Professional Speaker.”

Another friend of mine proudly refers to herself as a “Freelance Technical/Business Writer, Blogger, Community Foundation Backer, Social Media Pro, Master Connector/Encourager.” She is a business owner, but leads with her value to others.

Yet another one of my LinkedIn connections uses “Owner JL Consulting: Marketing Strategy and Brand Management | Speaker | Scientist at Social Buzz Lab.” He references his business ownership, but wants you to know what he can do to help you.

I currently refer to myself as “Social Media Coach teaching LinkedIn, Blogging, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube & MailChimp,” not as a business owner.

What is your LinkedIn Title and why did you choose to use it? 

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