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TLB Word of the Year

My Word of the Year – 2022

My 2022 Word of the Year is a sign of the transition that has begun in my life and business.

The word I have chosen as my Word of the Year for 2022 is “No.”

No is a powerful word. It’s also an important life and business tool.

I realize why I need to say no to others who ask me to do things that are beyond my interest, concern, or responsibility.

Yet, I also need to say no to myself as I consider doing things I know are not appropriate or necessary for me to do.

I understand the importance of saying no to activities that can hurt me or damage the relationships I have with the important people in my life or damage the brand of my business. I no longer climb trees and I will continue to say no to the throngs of women who try to seduce me (ok, that last part is all in my mind).

I understand the importance of saying no to spending money that I don’t really need to spend. This year, for the first time ever we bought a used car instead of a brand new car. It has turned out to be a great buy.  I’m also no longer interested in buying a motorcycle or a boat.

I’ve become better at saying no to spending time on tasks that I really don’t have to do. I no longer have the desire to rebuild a classic car, change the oil in my car, or for me to replace the windows in our home.

I’m learning to say no to consuming excessive foods & drinks. Although this Christmas I made the best Southern Mac-N-Cheese ever, I only had 1 serving. I am also managing my beer intake much better as I frequently say no to the kegerator as I walk by it.

I’m learning to say no to giving up too early on projects I have committed to, that I really need to complete, in a timely manner. Just this week I completed a bunch of honey-do tasks that I kept ignoring and I am proud of myself that I got this article written before the end of the year.

I’m learning to say no to ignoring good books that I said I should read, but have not gotten to. I now have three books on my end table that I am reading, instead of jumping on Netflix after dinner every day. One of these books is “essentialism, The Disciplined Pursuit of Less. I’m eager to read this book.”

Being more purposeful at saying no to time-sucking activities is providing me more time to spend with family and friends.  Rebecca and I spent a week in Maryland helping her parents recently when I would previously rather have been working on new YouTube videos.

This week I called a dozen people I have not talked to in years because I previously allowed myself to be consumed by unnecessary time-sucking activities. These calls were rewarding in many ways, mostly strengthening my relationships with these people.

Although our business is all about social media, I have begun to say no to jumping on social media all day long. I’ve already deleted my Snapchat and Clubhouse accounts. I have also deleted the NCWiseguy persona I created on Facebook, Twitter, Google, and the associated blog. It was fun while it lasted, but it has become a distraction and had to go.

Being more deliberate at saying no is also giving me more time to look at our business as a component of my life and to evaluate what is really important and what we should change. After a lot of research and consideration, we added a new YouTube Channel to the business. I am committed to growing it over the next few years as I now have more time available to do so. Saying no to the right stuff is a good thing.

Are you afraid to say no? I used to be. I had that FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) problem.

Are you saying no to requests, activities, time sucks that you really should say no to? Learn to do this more and it can have a positive impact on your life and business.

I have begun to be more purposeful at using the word no to minimize time-sucking activities that I need to say no to.

I am sure my 2022 and beyond will be richer in relationships and business success as I practice using the word no with purpose and intention.

Happy New Year.

Categories
TLB Word of the Year

My Word of the Year – 2020

I started using a word of the year back in 2013. Below are my previous year words:

  • 2019 – Wondering
  • 2018 – Action
  • 2017 – Gratitude
  • 2016 – Purpose
  • 2015 – Focus
  • 2014 – Deliberate
  • 2013 – #NoLimit

I remember making strides each year, in many cases because of my word of the year.

In 2013 I broke into new markets, 2014 I worked harder at new goals, 2015 I started ignoring the wrong stuff, 2016 I became even clearer at my business purpose, 2017 I added more volunteer activities to my calendar, 2018 I kept moving forward and in 2019 I started looking at new ideas for my business.

For 2020 I know I need a word that will help me keep up the focus, momentum, and activities. I’ve been pondering two words.

Amplify & Growth

As I pondered these two words a big difference came to mind.

Amplify provides for the opportunity to decline as with volume control.

Growth makes me think of the big Redwood trees in California.

Purchased Deposit Photos

Growth is what we all want, at least in our professional lives, careers, businesses, and our relationships. Growth of our investments would be a great thing as well.

I want my skills to grow.

I want my networks to grow.

I want my relationships to grow.

I want our business opportunities to grow.

I want our investments to grow.

I want our business to grow.

I think Growth is a great Mantra, ie Word of the Year for 2020.

What do you think? Do you have a word of the year that guides you in your steps?

Categories
LinkedIn

Don’t be afraid to engage or post on LinkedIn

Most LinkedIn Members are afraid to post anything on LinkedIn. They fear sharing content and commenting with any meaningful response beyond, “Thanks” or “Good stuff.” They’re afraid to post something that others will laugh at.

  • They’re afraid to it may be fake news.
  • They’re afraid their boss will yell at them.
  • They’re afraid of violating some rule or privacy guideline.
  • They’re afraid of making a huge mistake.
  • They’re afraid of the monsters lurking behind the keyboard.

The reasons are broad, however, they can be overcome.

I’ve made those mistakes, and I’ve lived to tell it about it.

Once, years ago one of my clients posted a YouTube Video that I commented on. My comment started out appreciative and supportive. Then I made a ’snide’ remark about the number of Ums & Ahs my client made in the video. He called me up and asked me, “is this how you want to engage with your client in public?” I immediately realized I made a mistake. I apologized and then deleted the comment and posted a positive one with no snide remarks.   I learned from this mistake. I no longer criticize, condemn or complain on social media.

Another time I decided to get into an argument with someone on Facebook about a political issue. OMG, that failed miserably. I deleted all of my comments, took my public beating for running from the argument and, learned from my mistake. I no longer discuss politics or religion on social media.

“Live and learn, most importantly learn so you can live a better life.”Teddy Burriss Quote

I have three edicts I’ve adopted that help me to overcome some of these fears:

“Never do, say or engage in any way you don’t want to be seen, heard or perceived of in life.”

“Everything you post on social media must be TRUHE (Transparent, Relevant, Useful, Honest and Engaging or exciting, educational or entertaining.”

“It’s not all about you (Teddy), rather make it all about your target audience.”

Adopting these edicts have kept me from making more dumb mistakes on social media as well as in life.

Now, with these ideas, how do we help people who should be engaging more, yet are still a little afraid?

It’s not easy, but you can start practicing and in time all of your fears will go away.
Here are some more tactics that may help:

  • Listen to the words you say out loud when you are talking with a client, a prospect or someone else relevant to your business. Often what we say out loud could be a simple post on social media. The quote I wrote in this article, “Live and learn, most importantly learn so you can live a better life” became a graphic, Facebook and even LinkedIn Post.
  • Listen to what your target audience says and asks you. Again, often these words and/or your response to them could become a simple post, if not a full-fledge blog post. This article here came from a conversation with a client who asked me, “Teddy, how can I get more comfortable engaging on social media?”
  • Listen to the conversations at networking events, board meetings, conferences, symposiums, seminars, in the news, in trade magazines, industry websites, podcasts, and people on the street. When we discover the conversations going on around us, relevant to our businesses and our clients, these conversations can be sparks for your own posts, articles, videos, graphics and even a well-intentioned selfie.
  • Read what your target audience is talking about. Search for these conversations by keywords and/or by the individuals or brands. Read, or at least review the conversation and then imagine sitting at a coffee shop with a good friend and they just told you what you read. How would you reply back to them? What ideas come to mind? What words could you cobble together in a positive way and then respond? 
  • Read content on LinkedIn relevant to your business and your clients. If you liked it, maybe, just maybe, someone else in your network will like it. Hit the Share button and help someone else learn something. Always tell your viewer what you got from the article when you share it.
  • This is important, don’t overthink what you are going to post or comment. Think about it, but if you spend too much time noodling your post or comment, it’ll come out looking scripted and seem fake.
  • Don’t overdo it. You don’t need a new post, article, video, graphic or comment every hour or even every day. Practice slowly. Practice around the people you trust and respect. Engage on their content first.  Practice again on someone else’s content. Don’t try to create a post around every conversation you hear. Rather let your subconscious lead you with the most meaningful conversations you hear.

Practice does not make perfect. Practice makes permanent. I know this because I listened to a client ask me a question and it spurred me to write this article. I wrote what I thought was an interesting quote, and I took it to another level. Practice every day.

If you want my help, comment on my stuff and then message me and ask me, “Teddy, did I do OK?” I promise you as long as it was TRUHE and you did not overthink it, the answer will be Yes. 

If you want my help to guide your sales team on content creation and curation, let’s talk.

/Teddy

Categories
LinkedIn

It’s a Journey, not a Race

I’m seeing more and more advertisements for ‘instant’, ‘rapid’ and ‘easy’ automation methods or processes around using LinkedIn.

Even though these plugins, applications, extensions, services, etc may automate and speed up the use of some areas of LinkedIn, this is fact; they are all doomed to fail like a house of cards.

And, if you are not capable of running your business without these automation tools, your business could fail as well.

I make this bold statement based on two facts.

#1 – LinkedIn’s Terms of Service very clearly states you are not allowed to use any 3rd party application to automate any of the LinkedIn processes within the application. Read Section 8 of the Terms of Services completely.

#2 – LinkedIn is the 800# Gorilla who owns the application and access to the data. (You may own your LinkedIn data, just not the application that accesses it.)

None of these businesses creating these ‘unauthorized’ crawlers, browser plugins and add-ons, or any other technology, can sustain the application changes they have to keep making as LinkedIn counters their ‘attacks’ on the data and LinkedIn application.

It may cost LinkedIn lots of money to keep fending off the violators to their terms of services, however, LinkedIn’s pockets and determination are greater than the businesses who are violating LinkedIn’s terms of service.

I strongly feel it is not wise to build a business or allow my employees to build business processes using these 3rd party tools and ignoring these two points.

There are many things in my life where I expect instant gratification. Turn on the water, turn on a light, fire up Apple Music, Netflix or the coffee pot.

However, getting instant results from LinkedIn is not something I expect or want. It’s not sustainable.

LinkedIn is a professional networking tool and plays an important role in relationship development when you use LinkedIn appropriately.

Networking and relationship development is a journey, not a race.

Here are 5 reasons I look at using LinkedIn as a journey, not a race.

  1. I’m a relationship sales professional. I have some level of relationship with all of my clients. I like this style of business.
  2. I like to research my Most Important Viewers in my LinkedIn network and discover more about them so I can best engage with them using words and ideas they understand. This produces some of the richest conversations for me and them.
  3. Being organic in my use of LinkedIn allows me to find new processes, tactics, and styles that fit who I am and my business. This allows me to be different than others who have automated the basic steps of LinkedIn with less personality or uniqueness.
  4. For me, it would be devastating to use an automation tool that purports instant gratification and be discovered as less than sincere, honest, or real. See point #1 again.
  5. Getting into open conversations with my LinkedIn Network has created a huge advantage for me. This takes time and has uncovered new ideas that have had a positive impact on my life and/or business.
  6. I truly enjoy fulfilling this edict every day; “Networking is finding, developing and nurturing relationships that mutually move people forward through life.”

Again, networking and relationship development is a journey, not a race. The magic is in the journey. The rewards are in the conversations I get to have along the way. The benefits are mutual when I listen and get permission to share after I discover what is important to the other person.

My last point regarding using ‘unauthorized’ applications with LinkedIn is this; I believe I have built a fantastic LinkedIn Network, one that I am blessed to have. I also have created a strong reputation across LinkedIn in regard to the work I do and it makes my phone ring.

There is no way in the world I would jeopardize this and lose access to my LinkedIn account because I want instant gratification.

Categories
TLB Word of the Year

My Word of the Year – 2019

Yearly I put thought into a new Word of the Year.

These words become part of my year and help keep me on track of my goals in many different ways. They are never intended to disrupt me in any big way, but rather to help me along on my journey.

I encourage you to consider a word or phrase for yourself, on your own journey through life. Do you have a word that guides you as well?

This word has popped up in numerous conversations over the past few months and I can see how it will provide value for me in 2019 and beyond.

Webster defined Wondering as “desire or be curious to know something” as well as “feel admiration and amazement; marvel.”

Both of these definitions are applicable to my desire to wonder more as I journey forward in life. I want to continue to discover more knowledge and perspectives. I also enjoy admiring and being amazed by great things, words, events, and fabulous people in my life.

I intend to be #Deliberate as I apply this word of the year with #Purpose, #Focused on my goals as I execute the #Actions needed to be successful and show #Gratitude for my life.

Teddy

 

Previous Words of the Year:

2018 – Action

2017 – Gratitude

2016 – Purpose

2015 – Focus

2014 – Deliberate

2013 – #NoLimit

 

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