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Virtual Communications

As we try to figure out how to navigate through this pandemic (#COVID-19) virtual communication tools will become very important for us and our customers/prospects/clients, etc.

A few I believe may be very important to master include:

And, I’m sure there are many other options for remote/virtual communications tools we could be using during this pandemic.

What are you doing now to become familiar with these tools?

Have you researched what your clients/prospects etc are using?

I love using Zoom for my webinars and global conversations. I use Skype, Slack, Evernote & Google Docs every day. Many of my clients use these tools as well.

Virtual conversations through these tools is not new. They may be tools you have not considered or thought you needed.

Here is an offer. If you want to experiment with these tools, let me know. I will gladly help any business who wants to start experimenting and then using these tools.

I wish you all the best as you navigate this pandemic

/Teddy

How often should I engage on LinkedIn?

I get asked this question often and thought today would be a good day to answer this question here.

There is no single answer that fits everyone and/or every business or industry.

Typically my general answer is this:

Figure out the amount of time you can commit to engaging and sharing content on LinkedIn and stick to it. If you can’t sustain the activities, adjust your commitment and keep going. @TLBurriss

The magic of social engagement is sustaining the level of activity you decide to do for you.

A minimum amount I often encourage people to consider is 1 post and 1 comment on a relevant post each week. When you get good at navigating LinkedIn you’ll find this to be very easy to execute on and thus easy to sustain.

Once you get into this ‘groove’, take a look at these KPIs (Key Performance Indicators)

  • LinkedIn Profile Views.
  • Groth of your LinkedIn Network (with relevant connections).
  • Post engagement #s.
  • Phone calls, emails and/or LinkedIn Messages to discuss business.

You should never share and/or engage on LinkedIn just to do it. We have to have a purpose and goal for our actions. For me, my purpose is to develop my brand, drive profile views and ultimately get into conversations about business.

I’ve discovered that ramping up my activity of Engaging and sharing has a direct result on my brand development, profile views, and the ‘phone calls’. I do far more than most people, however LinkedIn is my home and business focus.

How much time are you investing in your LinkedIn engagement and posting? Is it creating value for you? Should you consider adjusting your investment of time and maybe the content type (a conversation for another day)

2020 Word of the Year

I started using a word of the year back in 2013. Below are my previous year words:

  • 2019 – Wondering
  • 2018 – Action
  • 2017 – Gratitude
  • 2016 – Purpose
  • 2015 – Focus
  • 2014 – Deliberate
  • 2013 – #NoLimit

I remember making strides each year, in many cases because of my word of the year.

In 2013 I broke into new markets, 2014 I worked harder at new goals, 2015 I started ignoring the wrong stuff, 2016 I became even clearer at my business purpose, 2017 I added more volunteer activities to my calendar, 2018 I kept moving forward and in 2019 I started looking at new ideas for my business.

For 2020 I know I need a word that will help me keep up the focus, momentum, and activities. I’ve been pondering two words.

Amplify & Growth

As I pondered these two words a big difference came to mind.

Amplify provides for the opportunity to decline as with volume control.

Growth makes me think of the big Redwood trees in California.

Purchased Deposit Photos

Growth is what we all want, at least in our professional lives, careers, businesses, and our relationships. Growth of our investments would be a great thing as well.

I want my skills to grow.

I want my networks to grow.

I want my relationships to grow.

I want our business opportunities to grow.

I want our investments to grow.

I want our business to grow.

I think Growth is a great Mantra, ie Word of the Year for 2020.

What do you think? Do you have a word of the year that guides you in your steps?

2020 Top 10 Tips using LinkedIn as a business tool

2020 Top 10 Tips Using LinkedIn

As I prepare for our January LinkedIn Mastermind Group, (more on this later) I also just wrapped up my 2020 Top 10 Tips using LinkedIn as a business tool.

As you have grown to expect, I share this information with my followers first.

Here are the youTube video and the LinkedIn Slideshare regarding these 2020 Top 10 Tips using LinkedIn as a business tool.

YouTube Video (13:20 minutes)


Slideshare PowerPoint (14 slides)


I’m preparing right now (12/08/19) for our end of January 2020 LinkedIn Mastermind Group. It will be bigger and better than all previous Mastermind groups.

We’ll have lots of great content including over 3-hours of live webinars.

If you want to consider an early entry option to this 6-week program, contact me.

/Teddy

Social Selling vs Social Networking

Earlier today I responded to a LinkedIn post where the author basically said this:

“Yeah, I get the unspoken LinkedIn rule.
‘No selling too soon on LinkedIn via DM.’
But why? This is a business site.
It’s like we’re all at a singles bar trying to pretend we’re here only for the conversation.
Yeah, sure we are.
Do you want to sell me something? Go ahead. give it a shot!
You can even do it in the first DM you send me!
(By the way, I haven’t tried to sell anything on LinkedIn. Yet.)”

From a LinkedIn Post

Some of those who jumped into the conversation responded with “Yes, we should get to the sales messaging as quickly as possible.”

Some responded with “No, LinkedIn is not where you sell.”


My response went like this:

I think I understand your post, Steve.

Your idea may work for some who play the numbers game of connecting/selling, ie LinkedIn Cold-Calling, however, it doesn’t appeal to me.

For me, LinkedIn is primarily a research, branding & communications site.  Once I have done enough research and I am ready, I’ll call, email or LinkedIn message the right people & ask the right question(s). 

Maybe that question is “who should I send the invoice to?” or Maybe that question is, “when & where do you want to meet?”

It all depends on the results of the research, prior engagement and other activities that have occurred outside of LinkedIn.

I’m in this for the long journey. I don’t want to become ‘another guy who cold calls on LinkedIn.’

Again, this works for me, maybe not for others. Regarding your post, maybe LinkedIn cold calling works for others, it does not appeal to me.

Thanks for sparking an interesting conversation, even the bar scene tips others threw in here. (lol)

My comment to the post on LinkedIn

Now, I know that my ideas, philosophies, and tactics are not for everyone. However, I know that my processes work well for me.

This is why I teach my style, my tactics, steps, and best practices across the globe. I’m actually preparing to kick off my January 2020 LinkedIn Mastermind Group where I’ll share my philosophies, tactics, tips, tricks, hacks and many of my processes with others. Maybe you’ll want to join in. More info to come soon.

I like to refer to my use of LinkedIn as Social Networking, not Social Selling. For me, Social Networking is the foundation of Relationship Selling.

The phrase Social Selling is so twisted and misunderstood by so many people.

Do you prefer to do LinkedIn Cold-Calling? I’m still not a fan of any flavor of cold calling.

Or, do you prefer relationship sales? Yes, it’s a much longer journey, but this works for me.

Please share your thoughts in the comments.

/Teddy

Get Efficient using LinkedIn

If you are using LinkedIn purposefully you are repeating a lot of steps every day.

Examples are:

  • Sending new LinkedIn Invites
  • Accepting LinkedIn Invites
  • Campaign Messaging to your relevant LinkedIn Network.
  • Acknowledging Birthday, new jobs and Career Anniversaries.

The larger your LinkedIn Network grows and the more you start engaging purposefully with them, the more you’ll see the keys wearing out on your keyboard.

I wore out the keys on my Macbook Pro and then my <1yr old Macbook.

This is what happens when you write a couple of blog posts a day, are working on two new Ebooks, post on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, and other blog sites every day.

A few years ago I found a tool that not only helps me minimize the damage I am doing to my keyboards, but it also helped me be more efficient in my social engagement.

Text Expander by Smile lets you instantly insert snippets of text 
from your own repository of content, as you type – using a quick search or abbreviated codes.

I created a huge library of shortcodes. Most of mine start with “;” and then a 3-4 character code.

Here are some examples I use every day:

  • ;em – My email address (saves 28 keystrokes)
  • ;lk – the word LinkedIn (saved 5 keystrokes)
  • ;lm – the phrase LinkedIn Member (saves 12 keystrokes)
  • ;ls – the phrase LinkedIn Search (saves 12 keystrokes)
  • ;lp – the phrase LinkedIn Profile (13 keystrokes)
  • ;in – the phrase LinkedIn Network (13 keystrokes)
  • ;eb1 – The URL to my primary ebook (saves 47 keystrokes)
  • ;eb2 – The second ebook URL (saves 47 keystrokes)
  • ;eb3 – The third ebook URL (saves 47 keystrokes)
  • ;tlb1 – My primary post signature used in blog posts, articles, etc (saves 67 keystrokes)
  • ;pl – My standard template of text asking LinkedIn Members to connect with me (saves 89 characters)
  • ;whyli – My standard template asking LinkedIn Members why they sent me an invite to connect (saves 297 keystrokes)
  • ;thxli – My standard template for thank you for connecting on LinkedIn (saves 392 keystrokes)
  • And a huge handful of snippets for the many URLs I type every day (calendly, blog articles, my YouTube videos, etc, etc, etc)

Using TextExpander has been a huge advantage for me. Beyond the time savings, it helps me to be more consistent with my words and to minimize spelling and grammar errors. For my URL’s it has helped me to make sure I don’t ‘fat-finger’ them and embarrass myself.

I love my TextExpander for lots of reasons. and would be lost without it.

I use TextExpander on My Macbook Pro, my Macbook as well as my iPad and iPhone. My business partner uses it on her PC.

Note – functionality on the iPad and iPhone is a little different and took time for me to get effective using it there. But, I got it now!

If you are struggling to find time to do all you should be doing online, you have to have TextExpander by Smile

Get your own subscription to TextExpander today. You won’t regret it.

Note – this post has my affiliate link in it – why – Because I want you to know TextExpander is a powerful tool

LinkedIn Messaging

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching - LinkedIn Messaging 101

Messaging on LinkedIn, now in some cases called Chat, is just one way to communicate and/or engage with your LinkedIn Network.

Before I share the features available to you, I need to alert you to this fact.

Not every LinkedIn Member is on LinkedIn enough to see or engage with you through your LinkedIn message. I generally look for the Green Circle (they are on LinkedIn now) or the green ring (they have LinkedIn Mobile Notifications enabled), before I consider sending a LinkedIn Message of any type. Understanding this can help you manage your LinkedIn messaging expectations.

OK, now I’ll share information about the messaging features and functions on the Desktop and Mobile Application:

Desktop Access – LinkedIn Messaging can be accessed from the following locations on the Desktop Browser application:


LinkedIn Newsfeed – Hover over a 1st Level LinkedIn Member name/profile picture in the LinkedIn Newsfeed and click on Message or Chat


You Connections List – accessed from My Network on the top-level menu bar, and then Connections, you can do a search for first, last or full name, or just scroll the list and then use the Message or Chat option on the right of a LinkedIn Member in the list.

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching Image - Message from LinkedIn Network with Name Search

LinkedIn Groups – From the Member list of any LinkedIn Group you are in, you can send any member a message, even if you are not a 1st level connection. You can send up to 15 messages a month to any Group member, across all of your LinkedIn groups.

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching  Image - Message from LinkedIn Network Page

LinkedIn Company Pages – Viewing 1st Level LinkedIn Members from a LinkedIn Company Page, by clicking on the line xxx connections work here:

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching  Image - Message access Company 1st Level Connections

shows up in LinkedIn Search using the Company and Connection filters. You can send a message to your 1st level connections from any Search Result window.

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching  Image - Message Company Page 1st Level Search Results

LinkedIn Profile – You can send a message to your 1st level connection from their LinkedIn Profile.

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching  Image - Message from LinkedIn Profile

Your Network Invites – You can reply to and send a new message to anyone who sends you an original LinkedIn Invite. (I use the word original because there is a problem messaging people who send an invite after you previously ignored another invite.) You do this from the Invitation Manager accessed from your My Network page.

Click on the See All xxx on the top right of the My Network page opens the Invitation Manager page where you can reply and/or send a new message to your invites.


LinkedIn Messages page – Access the full LinkedIn Message page from the top menu bar. This will open a standard Chat Manager where you can read, reply and create new LinkedIn messages


Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching  Image - LinkedIn Messages Page

LinkedIn Message Bar – This is on the lower right corner of most LinkedIn pages viewed in a web browser.

When clicked on this message bar, it opens upwards so you can access all of your LinkedIn Messages by scrolling or searching by keywords or names. Creating a new message will open up a message box on the lower area of the LinkedIn page.


Mobiles Access – LinkedIn Messaging can be accessed from the same locations in the LinkedIn Mobile Application, except there is no Message bar in the mobile app. The Full Message Page icon is only accessible from the upper right corner of the LinkedIn Home page.

Additionally, from the LinkedIn Mobile App, you can not send a message to LinkedIn Members who send you a LinkedIn invite. You can reply to LinkedIn invites that include a personal message.


Message Formats – The message formats between Mobile and Desktop are similar with a few exceptions.

Desktop Formats

From either the Message Bar or from the Full Message Page, the options are similar.

You can send a message to a single connection or to a group of LinkedIn Connections.

You can use text, include URLs to online content (the first URL will resolve to display) and include the URL to other LinkedIn Members by @Mentioning the LinkedIn Member (it will not notify the other LinkedIn Member).

You can attach an image, a file, a GIF or an emoticon image.


Mobile Formats

On the mobile application messaging has more features.

Teddy Burriss - LinkedIn Training and Coaching  Image - LinkedIn Mobile Message Options

Beyond the options available on the desktop interface, in the Mobile Application, you have lots more options available.

You can include an image or video from your device Camera.


You can include a Location if you allow the LinkedIn app to access your Device Location.

You can select available times through Availability if you allow the LinkedIn app to access your device calendar.
You can also include an audio recording in a LinkedIn Message.

There are lots of interesting options in the LinkedIn Mobile App messaging function

I encourage all LinkedIn Members to experience using the mobile application. Besides taking the LinkedIn environment with you as you are ‘out and about’, the messaging features are worth experimenting with.


How much time does it take?

I get asked often, “How much time should someone spend on LinkedIn?” I don’t want to answer this question because it’s not focused on a goal.

I would prefer to answer this question, “How much time should someone put into using LinkedIn in order to create real business results?”

Sometimes I answer the question this way, “Consider reinvesting 10-15 minutes every day using LinkedIn to build your presence, your network, and your reputation. Look at the other related tasks you’re doing today that don’t create the greatest results and invest that time into using LinkedIn instead.” (Example – extended cold calling)

This is hard for people to do because they are comfortable with those other tactics, even if they are not creating real results.

This is hard for people to do because they are not sure yet of the right way to use LinkedIn. They have not experimented enough or been taught the proper use of LinkedIn.

The best answer is this, “I strongly recommend LinkedIn Members who want to create real business value need to integrate the use of LinkedIn into other relevant business processes.” (Example – I never cold call without first doing research on LinkedIn.)

There are lots of actions you can do using LinkedIn. Which ones are right for you is directly influenced by your goals. Here are a few ideas:

  • If you are recruiter you may need to invest more time doing research on candidate Profiles and less time on 1:1 engagement and content sharing.
  • If you work a captive book of business (i.e not hunting for new clients), you’re more likely going to spend time sharing and engaging on relevant content and less time using the LinkedIn Search tools.
  • If you are an inside salesperson focused on current clients, you may spend more time on 1:1 engagement and content sharing than you would on market/industry researching.
  • If you are in marketing you’re likely going to spend more time researching companies, relevant content and influencers and less time searching for people or engaging on content.

These are just a few of the diverse ways different people in different roles could be using LinkedIn.

Look at some of the different functions available within LinkedIn:

  • Refining/updating your LinkedIn Profile.
  • Commenting on and/or Liking Content.
  • Sending new LinkedIn Invites.
  • Managing LinkedIn Invites.
  • 1:1 messaging using text, images, documents, audio, and video, etc.
  • Sharing and engaging on content in LinkedIn Groups.
  • Research of LinkedIn Companies and Content.
  • Reading relevant and useful content.
  • Researching other LinkedIn Members
  • Analyzing your LinkedIn Insights (Profile views, Content activity,
  • Managing LinkedIn Notifications
  • Prospecting through LinkedIn Search
  • Sharing content in your LinkedIn Company Page
  • etc, etc, etc

I sometimes say LinkedIn is like a swiss army knife. Knowing what all the different blades are, helps you to determine which one to use when, and/or at all.

You don’t need to do everything all the time. You use specific areas of LinkedIn based on the specific task and/or goal.

Back to how much time should you spend using LinkedIn, and doing what?

Initially, I recommend investing a minimum of 15 minutes a day reviewing the different ‘knives’ and deciding what steps within LinkedIn could create the greatest initial value for you in your role. Then once you know how to use the tools, align your use of LinkedIn with other business processes while you continue to invest 15 minutes a day learning more about the tool and how you could again, integrate another LinkedIn activity into another business process.

Fact – if you don’t find a way to integrate the use of LinkedIn into other business processes, you will never completely adopt LinkedIn as a business tool in your role.

No one is truly successful using LinkedIn as a ‘stand-alone’ business tool

Don’t be this social media user

Don’t become that social media user who:

  • everyone wonders, “could he be one of those Kenyan or Russian Bots or just a Fake Account.
  • their network thinks they are only trying to sell their latest widget.
  • only spouts political or religious stuff online.
  • strives to foster fear and animosity in their network.
  • only looks to ‘pick a fight’ in every comment.
  • gets all excited when they hijack a conversation.
  • only shares pics of drop-dead gorgeous, sexy, lean, slick, shimmering scantily clad cars or multimillion-dollar estates.
  • drops stuff into social media hourly, but never joins into the conversations.
  • has a stuck selfie trigger finger.
  • seeks opportunities to criticize, condemn and complain about anything all the time.
  • sends out friend requests and connection requests to every Tom, Dick, and Harry in the Milkyway.
  • the moment they discover you disagree with them in any way they remove you as a Friend or Connection.
  • has never updated their social media profiles in the past 30 years. (hehe)
  • still has their college yearbook picture as their profile pic.
  • shares everything from Publisher Clearing House Ginsu knives, stories of the lost Satchsquatch, the best practices of cutting glass, etc, etc, but never anything about themselves or their family/community.
  • shares everything across all social media platforms at once.
  • feels the nasty/disgusting language they use on social media is ok, even though they would never say it in real life.
  • says, I don’t care about people on social media. They are not real to me.
  • does not verify what they post, especially when it seems like it could be fake.

This is just a shortlist of the types of social media users we should strive not to be.
If you want to create value using social media, enjoy using social media, be trusted, respected and even liked for your use of social media, be better than all this above.

Consider how you are using social media. Remember, it all has to be TRUHE

  • Transparent
  • Relevant
  • Useful
  • Honest
  • Engaging, exciting, educational, entertaining

And, it can’t be all about you.

/Teddy

Don’t be afraid to engage or post on LinkedIn

Most LinkedIn Members are afraid to post anything on LinkedIn. They fear sharing content and commenting with any meaningful response beyond, “Thanks” or “Good stuff.” They’re afraid to post something that others will laugh at.

  • They’re afraid to it may be fake news.
  • They’re afraid their boss will yell at them.
  • They’re afraid of violating some rule or privacy guideline.
  • They’re afraid of making a huge mistake.
  • They’re afraid of the monsters lurking behind the keyboard.

The reasons are broad, however, they can be overcome.

I’ve made those mistakes, and I’ve lived to tell it about it.

Once, years ago one of my clients posted a YouTube Video that I commented on. My comment started out appreciative and supportive. Then I made a ’snide’ remark about the number of Ums & Ahs my client made in the video. He called me up and asked me, “is this how you want to engage with your client in public?” I immediately realized I made a mistake. I apologized and then deleted the comment and posted a positive one with no snide remarks.   I learned from this mistake. I no longer criticize, condemn or complain on social media.

Another time I decided to get into an argument with someone on Facebook about a political issue. OMG, that failed miserably. I deleted all of my comments, took my public beating for running from the argument and, learned from my mistake. I no longer discuss politics or religion on social media.

“Live and learn, most importantly learn so you can live a better life.”Teddy Burriss Quote

I have three edicts I’ve adopted that help me to overcome some of these fears:

“Never do, say or engage in any way you don’t want to be seen, heard or perceived of in life.”

“Everything you post on social media must be TRUHE (Transparent, Relevant, Useful, Honest and Engaging or exciting, educational or entertaining.”

“It’s not all about you (Teddy), rather make it all about your target audience.”

Adopting these edicts have kept me from making more dumb mistakes on social media as well as in life.

Now, with these ideas, how do we help people who should be engaging more, yet are still a little afraid?

It’s not easy, but you can start practicing and in time all of your fears will go away.
Here are some more tactics that may help:

  • Listen to the words you say out loud when you are talking with a client, a prospect or someone else relevant to your business. Often what we say out loud could be a simple post on social media. The quote I wrote in this article, “Live and learn, most importantly learn so you can live a better life” became a graphic, Facebook and even LinkedIn Post.
  • Listen to what your target audience says and asks you. Again, often these words and/or your response to them could become a simple post, if not a full-fledge blog post. This article here came from a conversation with a client who asked me, “Teddy, how can I get more comfortable engaging on social media?”
  • Listen to the conversations at networking events, board meetings, conferences, symposiums, seminars, in the news, in trade magazines, industry websites, podcasts, and people on the street. When we discover the conversations going on around us, relevant to our businesses and our clients, these conversations can be sparks for your own posts, articles, videos, graphics and even a well-intentioned selfie.
  • Read what your target audience is talking about. Search for these conversations by keywords and/or by the individuals or brands. Read, or at least review the conversation and then imagine sitting at a coffee shop with a good friend and they just told you what you read. How would you reply back to them? What ideas come to mind? What words could you cobble together in a positive way and then respond? 
  • Read content on LinkedIn relevant to your business and your clients. If you liked it, maybe, just maybe, someone else in your network will like it. Hit the Share button and help someone else learn something. Always tell your viewer what you got from the article when you share it.
  • This is important, don’t overthink what you are going to post or comment. Think about it, but if you spend too much time noodling your post or comment, it’ll come out looking scripted and seem fake.
  • Don’t overdo it. You don’t need a new post, article, video, graphic or comment every hour or even every day. Practice slowly. Practice around the people you trust and respect. Engage on their content first.  Practice again on someone else’s content. Don’t try to create a post around every conversation you hear. Rather let your subconscious lead you with the most meaningful conversations you hear.

Practice does not make perfect. Practice makes permanent. I know this because I listened to a client ask me a question and it spurred me to write this article. I wrote what I thought was an interesting quote, and I took it to another level. Practice every day.

If you want my help, comment on my stuff and then message me and ask me, “Teddy, did I do OK?” I promise you as long as it was TRUHE and you did not overthink it, the answer will be Yes. 

If you want my help to guide your sales team on content creation and curation, let’s talk.

/Teddy